Posts Tagged: RX-Partners


20
Aug 12

Inside the Grum Botnet

KrebsOnSecurity has obtained an exclusive look inside the back-end operations of the recently-destroyed Grum spam botnet. It appears that this crime machine was larger and more complex than many experts had imagined. It also looks like my previous research into the identity of the Grum botmaster was right on target.

The “Stats” page from a Grum botnet control panel show more than 193,000 systems were infected with the malware.

A source in the ISP community who asked to remain anonymous shared a copy of a Web server installation that was used as a controller for the Grum botnet. That controller contained several years’ worth of data on the botnet’s operations, as well as detailed stats on the spam machine’s size just prior to its takedown.

At the time of Grum’s demise in mid-July 2012, it was responsible for sending roughly one in every six spams delivered worldwide, and capable of blasting 18 billion spam emails per day. Anti-spam activists at Spamhaus.org estimated that there were about 136,000 Internet addresses seen sending spam for Grum.

But according to the database maintained on this Grum control server prior to its disconnection in mid-July, more than 193,000 systems were infected with one of three versions of the Grum code, malware that turned host systems into spam-spewing zombies. The system seems to have kept track of infected machines not by Internet address but with a unique identifier for each PC, although it’s not immediately clear how the Grum botnet system derived or verified those identifying fingerprints.

Some of Grum’s email lists. Most lists contained upwards of 20 million addresses.

The Web interface used to control the botnet was called “Zagruska Systems,” (“zagruska” is a transliteration of the Russian word “загрузка,” which means “download”). The HTML code on the server includes the message “Spam Service Coded by -= ( Spiderman).”

The password used to administer the botnet’s Web-based interface was “a28fe103a93d6705d1ce6720dbeb5779″; that’s an MD5 hash of the password “megerasss”. Interestingly, this master password contains the name Gera, which I determined in an earlier investigative story was the nickname used by the Grum botmaster. The name Gera also is used as a title for one of several classes of forged email headers that the botnet had available to send junk mail; other titles for falsified header types included the names “Chase,” “eBay” and “Wachovia,” suggesting a possible phishing angle.

Continue reading →


3
Jul 12

Who Says Email Is Eating at Postal Revenues?

Shadowy online businesses that sell knockoff prescription drugs through spam and other dodgy advertising practices have begun relying more heavily on the U.S. Postal Service to deliver prescription drugs to buyers in the United States direct from warehouses or mules within the U.S. The shift comes as rogue online pill shops are seeking ways to lower shipping costs, a major loss leader for most of these operations.

An ad for Rx-Parners pill shop that ships from the US.

Traditionally, a majority of the counterfeit pills advertised and sold to Americans online have shipped from India. But the process of getting the pills from India to customers in the United States is so expensive and fraught with complications that it has proved to be a big cost center for the largest rogue pharmaceutical operations, according to a study I wrote about last month.

“One of the surprising things we found was that shipping dominates program costs,” said Stefan Savage, one of the lead authors on the study, and a professor in the systems and networking group at the University of California San Diego.

The researchers discovered that most rogue pharmacy operations spend between 11 to 12 percent of their annual revenue on shipping costs. Part of the reason for the high cost is that pill shipments from India and elsewhere outside of the United States frequently get delayed or confiscated by U.S. Customs officials. This forces the rogue pharmacies to either refund the customer’s money, or to eat the costs of re-shipping the pills.

Increasingly, however, some of the largest spam affiliate programs are delivering some of their most popular drugs — including erectile dysfunction pills and everything from Accutane to Cipro and Diflucan and Plavix — direct to U.S. buyers from shipping locations within the United States.

“This is why you see pharmacy outfits like RX-Partners, Mailien and Stimulcash picking the most popular drugs and warehousing them in the United States so they can do USPS shipping through mules,” Savage said.

Continue reading →