Posts Tagged: Shockwave Player


19
Dec 12

Shocking Delay in Fixing Adobe Shockwave Bug

The Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) is warning about a dangerous security hole in Adobe’s Shockwave Player that could be used to silently install malicious code. The truly shocking aspect of this bug? U.S. CERT first warned Adobe about the vulnerability in October 2010, and Adobe says it won’t be fixing it until February 2013.

shockwaveShockwave is a browser plug-in that some sites require. At issue is a feature of Adobe Shockwave that allows the installation of “Xtras,” downloadable components meant to interact with the media player. According to an advisory from US-CERT the problem is that Shockwave installs Xtras that are signed by Adobe or Macromedia without prompting, which can allow an attacker to target vulnerabilities in older Xtras.

From the advisory:

When a Shockwave movie attempts to use an Xtra, it will download and install it as necessary. If the Xtra is signed by Adobe or Macromedia, it will be installed automatically without any user interaction. Because the location from which Shockwave downloads the Xtra is stored in the Shockwave movie itself, this can allow an attacker to host old, vulnerable Xtras that can be installed and exploited automatically when a Shockwave movie is played.

US-CERT warned that by convincing a user to view a specially crafted Shockwave content (e.g., a web page or an HTML email message or attachment), an attacker may be able to execute arbitrary code with the privileges of the user.

Reached via email, an Adobe spokeswoman confirmed that US-CERT had alerted the company about the flaw in October 2010, but said Adobe is not aware of any active exploits or attacks in the wild using this vulnerability.

“Adobe has been working on addressing this issue in the next major release of Adobe Shockwave Player, which is currently scheduled to be released in February 2013,” Adobe’s Wiebke Lips wrote.

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14
Aug 12

Critical Security Fixes from Adobe, Microsoft

Adobe and Microsoft each issued security updates today to fix critical vulnerabilities in their software. Adobe’s fixes include a patch for a Flash Player flaw that is actively being exploited to break into Windows computers. Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday release includes nine patch bundles — more than half of them rated critical — addressing at least 27 security holes in Windows and related software.

The most pressing of the updates Adobe released today is the Flash Player patch, which fixes a critical flaw (CVE-2012-1535) in the ubiquitous media player software. Adobe says there are reports that the vulnerability is being exploited in the wild in limited targeted attacks, distributed through a malicious Microsoft Word document. The exploit targets the ActiveX version of Flash Player for Internet Explorer on Windows.

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8
May 12

Adobe, Microsoft Push Critical Security Fixes

Adobe and Microsoft today each issued updates to address critical security flaws in their software. Adobe’s patch plugs at least five holes in its Shockwave Player, while Microsoft has released a bundle of seven updates to correct 23 vulnerabilities in Windows and other products.

Microsoft’s May patch batch includes fixes for vulnerabilities that could be exploited via Web browsing, file-sharing, or email. Eight of the 23 flaws earned Microsoft’s “critical” rating, meaning no user interaction is required for vulnerable systems to be hacked. At least three of the flaws were publicly disclosed before today.

According to Microsoft, the two updates are the most dire: The first is one related to a critical flaw in Microsoft Word (MS12-029); the second is an unusually ambitious update that addresses flaws present in Microsoft Office, Windows, .NET Framework and Silverlight. In a blog post published today, Microsoft explained why it chose to patch all of these seemingly disparate products all in one go. But the short version is that Microsoft is addressing the ghost of Duqu, a sophisticated malware family discovered last year that was designed to attack industrial control systems and is thought to be related to the infamous Stuxnet worm. A patch Microsoft issued last year addressed the underlying Windows vulnerability exploited by Duqu, but the company found that the same vulnerable code resided in a slew of other Microsoft applications.

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