Posts Tagged: Schneider Electric


26
Oct 12

DHS Warns of ‘Hacktivist’ Threat Against Industrial Control Systems

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is warning that a witches brew of recent events make it increasingly likely that politically or ideologically motivated hackers may launch digital attacks against industrial control systems. The alert was issued the same day that security researchers published information about an undocumented software backdoor in industrial control systems sold by hundreds different manufacturers and widely used in power plants, military environments and nautical ships.

The information about the backdoor was published by industrial control systems (ICS) security vendor Digital Bond, which detailed how a component used in industrial control systems sold by 261 manufacturers contains a functionality that will grant remote access to anyone who knows the proper command syntax and inner workings of the device, leaving systems that are connected to the public open to malicious tampering.

In an interview with Ars Technica, Reid Wightman, a researcher formerly with Digital Bond and now at security firm ioActive, said there was “absolutely no authentication needed to perform this privileged command.” Of the two specific programmable logic controllers (PLCs) Wightman tested, both allowed him to issue commands that halted the devices’ process control.

“Imagine if your laptop had a service that accepted an unauthenticated ‘shutdown’ command, and if someone sent it your laptop [would] shut off and you [would lose] all your work,” Wightman told Ars. “Anybody on the network could shut off your laptop without needing your password. That would suck. And that’s the case here.”

Potentially aiding would-be attackers are specialized search engines like Shodan and the Every Routable IP Project, which were designed specifically to locate online devices that may be overlooked or ignored by regular search engines. Indeed, according to Wightman, a quick search using Shodan revealed 117 vulnerable devices directly connected to the Internet, although Wightman said he suspected the computer location service could turn up far more with a more targeted search. To complicate matters further, Wightman said tools for automating the exploitation of the backdoor will soon be made available for Metasploit, a penetration testing tool used by hackers and security professionals alike.

In an alert (PDF) issued Thursday, DHS warned that these search engines are being actively used to identify and access control systems over the Internet, and that combining these tools with easily obtainable exploitation tools, attackers can identify and access control systems with significantly less effort than ever before.

“Multiple threat elements are combining to significantly increase the ICSs threat landscape,” DHS warned. “Hacktivist groups are evolving and have demonstrated improved malicious skills. They are acquiring and using specialized search engines to identify Internet facing control systems, taking advantage of the growing arsenal of exploitation tools developed specifically for control systems. In addition, individuals from these groups have posted online requests for others to visit or access the identified device addresses. Asset owners should take these changes in threat landscape seriously…and should not assume that their control systems are secure or that they are not operating with an Internet accessible configuration. Instead, asset owners should thoroughly audit their networks for Internet facing devices, weak authentication methods, and component vulnerabilities.”

But according to Digital Bond, asset owners — such as power utilities, water treatment facilities — aren’t moving fast enough to take such steps. Indeed, this is the driving premise behind “Project Basecamp,” the company’s endeavor to publish and expose control systems vulnerabilities: Only when control system operators begin to see how these vulnerabilities could be used to disrupt their operations will they be motivated enough to demand that ICS hardware and software vendors make security a priority.

“The goal of Project Basecamp is to make the risk of these fragile and insecure devices so apparent and easy to demonstrate that a decade of inaction will end,” the company explained on its blog. “Everyone knows PLC’s are vulnerable — or so we have heard for ten years now since the 9/11 attacks…Not only do they lack basic security features, they are also fragile. Warnings abound about the dangers of even running a port scan on a PLC. Yet even though “everyone knows” there has been little or no progress on developing even the option of purchasing a secure and robust PLC.”

The homepage of the Shodan search engine.

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26
Sep 12

Chinese Hackers Blamed for Intrusion at Energy Industry Giant Telvent

A company whose software and services are used to remotely administer and monitor large sections of the energy industry began warning customers last week that it is investigating a sophisticated hacker attack spanning its operations in the United States, Canada and Spain. Experts say digital fingerprints left behind by attackers point to a Chinese hacking group tied to repeated cyber-espionage campaigns against key Western interests.

The attack comes as U.S. policymakers remain gridlocked over legislation designed to beef up the cybersecurity posture of energy companies and other industries that maintain some of the world’s most vital information networks.

In letters sent to customers last week, Telvent Canada Ltd. said that on Sept. 10, 2012 it learned of a breach of its internal firewall and security systems. Telvent said the attacker(s) installed malicious software and stole project files related to one of its core offerings — OASyS SCADA — a product that helps energy firms mesh older IT assets with more advanced “smart grid” technologies.

The firm said it was still investigating the incident, but that as a precautionary measure, it had disconnected the usual data links between clients and affected portions of its internal networks.

“In order to be able to continue to provide remote support services to our customers in a secure manner, we have established new procedures to be followed until such time as we are sure that there are not further intrusions into the Telvent network and that all virus or malware files have been eliminated,” the company said in a letter mailed to customers this week, a copy of which was obtained by KrebsOnSecurity.com. “Although we do not have any reason to believe that the intruder(s) acquired any information that would enable them to gain access to a customer system or that any of the compromised computers have been connected to a customer system, as a further precautionary measure, we indefinitely terminated any customer system access by Telvent.”

The incident is the latest reminder of problems that can occur when corporate computer systems at critical networks are connected to sensitive control systems that were never designed with security in mind. Security experts have long worried about vulnerabilities being introduced into the systems that regulate the electrical grid as power companies transferred control of generation and distribution equipment from internal networks to so-called “supervisory control and data acquisition,” or SCADA, systems that can be accessed through the Internet or by phone lines. The move to SCADA systems boosts efficiency at utilities because it allows workers to operate equipment remotely, but experts say it also exposes these once-closed systems to cyber attacks.

Telvent did not respond to several requests for comment. But in a series of written communications to clients, the company detailed ongoing efforts to ascertain the scope and duration of the breach. In those communications, Telvent said it was working with law enforcement and a task force of representatives from its parent firm, Schneider Electric, a French energy conglomerate that employs 130,000 and has operations across the Americas, Western Europe and Asia. Telvent reportedly employs about 6,000 people in at least 19 countries around the world.

The disclosure comes just days after Telvent announced it was partnering with Foxborough, Mass. based Industrial Defender to expand its cybersecurity capabilities within Telvent’s key utility and critical infrastructure solutions. A spokesperson for Industrial Defender said the company does not comment about existing customers. Continue reading →