Posts Tagged: skimmer


3
Feb 16

Safeway Self-Checkout Skimmer Close Up

In Dec. 2015, KrebsOnSecurity warned that security experts had discovered skimming devices attached to credit and debit card terminals at self-checkout lanes at Safeway stores in Colorado and possibly other states. Safeway hasn’t disclosed what those skimmers looked like, but images from a recent skimming attack allegedly launched against self-checkout shoppers at a Safeway in Maryland offers a closer look at once such device.

Safeway Store, Germantown, Maryland

A skimming device made for self-checkout lanes that was removed from a Safeway Store in Germantown, Maryland

The image above shows an simple but effective “overlay” skimmer that banking industry sources say was retrieved from a Safeway store in Germantown, Md. The device is designed to fit directly over top of the Verifone terminals in use at many Safeways and other retailers. It has a PIN pad overlay to capture the user’s PIN, and a mechanism for recording the data stored on a card’s magnetic stripe when customers swipe their cards at self-checkout aisles.

Safeway officials did not respond to repeated requests for comment about this incident.

My local Safeway in Northern Virginia uses this exact model of Verifone terminals, and after seeing this picture for the first time I couldn’t help but pull on the terminal facing me in the self-checkout line on a recent store visit, just to be sure.

Many banks are now issuing newer, more secure chip-based credit and debit cards that are more expensive and difficult for thieves to steal and to counterfeit. As long as retailers continue to allow customers to avoid “dipping the chip” and instead allow “swipe the stripe” these skimming attacks on self-checkout lanes will continue to proliferate across the retail industry.

It may be worth noting that this skimming device looks remarkably similar to a point-of-sale skimmer designed for Verifone terminals that I wrote about in 2013.

Here’s a simple how-to video made by a fraudster who is selling very similar-looking overlay skimmers for Verifone point-of-sale devices; he calls them “Verifone condoms.” As we can see, the device could be attached in the blink of an eye (and removed quickly as well). The device in the video is just a shell, and does not include the POS PIN pad reader or card reader.


16
Jul 13

Getting Skimpy With ATM Skimmers

Cybercrooks can be notoriously cheap, considering how much they typically get for nothing. I’m reminded of this when I occasionally stumble upon underground forum members trying to  sell a used ATM skimmer: Very often, the sales thread devolves into a flame war over whether the fully-assembled ATM skimmer is really worth more than the sum of its parts.

Card skimmer device made for Wincor/Nixdorf ATMs

Card skimmer device made for Wincor/Nixdorf ATMs

Such was the fate of an audio-based ATM skimmer put up for sale recently on a private crime forum. The seller, a Ukrainian, was trying to offload a relatively pro-grade skimmer powered by parts cannibalized from an MP3 player and a small spy camera. The seller set the price at $2,450, but made the mistake of describing the device’s various parts, all of which can be purchased inexpensively from a variety of online retailers.

For example, he told forum members that the main component in the card skimmer as an MSR-605, which is a handheld magnetic stripe reader of the sort that you might find attached to a cash register/point-of-sale machine at a retail clothing store, for example.

This ubiquitous device can be had for approximately $200 at a number of places online, including Newegg.com and Amazon.com. The seller went on to describe the inexpensive flash storage drive that was incorporated in his device, and the modified tiny video camera that was hidden on the underside of a fake fascia designed to be affixed to the top of the ATM and record victims entering their PINs.

This tiny spy camera powers the fake ATM fascia that records victims entering their PINs.

This tiny spy camera powers the fake ATM fascia that records victims entering their PINs.

The image below shows the fake fascia as it appears from the side meant to be pointed toward the PIN pad. IMG_1871

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