Posts Tagged: SEO Sploit Pack


7
Dec 10

Rap Sheets on Top Software Vendors

A new online resource aims to make it easier to gauge the relative security risk of using different types of popular software, such as Web browsers and media players.

Last month, I railed against the perennial practice of merely counting vulnerabilities in a software product as a reliable measure of its security: Understanding the comparative danger of using different software titles, I argued, requires collecting much more information about each, such as how long known flaws existed without patches. Now, vulnerability management firm Secunia says its new software fact sheets try to address that information gap, going beyond mere vulnerability counts and addressing the dearth of standardized and scheduled reporting of important security parameters for top software titles.

Secunia "fact sheet" on Adobe Reader security flaws.

“In the finance industry, for example, key performance parameters are reported yearly or quarterly to consistently provide interested parties, and the public, with relevant information for decision-making and risk assessment,” the company said.

In addition to listing the number of vulnerabilities reported and fixed by different software vendors, the fact sheets show the impact of a successful attack on the flaw; whether the security hole was patched or unpatched on the day it was disclosed; and information about the window of exploit opportunity between disclosure and the date a patch was issued.

The fact sheets allow some useful comparisons — such as between Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer and Opera. But I’m concerned they will mainly serve to fan the flame wars over which browser is more secure. The reality, as shown by the focus of exploit kits like Eleonore, Crimepack and SEO Sploit Pack, is that computer crooks don’t care which browser you’re using: They rely on users browsing the Web with outdated software, especially browser plugins like Java, Adobe Flash and Reader (all links lead to PDF files).


11
Oct 10

Java: A Gift to Exploit Pack Makers

I have long urged readers who have no need for Java to remove the program, because failing to keep this software updated with the latest security patches exposes users to dangerous, ubiquitous attacks. In this blog post, I’ll show readers how attacks against Java vulnerabilities have fast emerged as the top moneymaker for authors of the best-selling “exploit kits,” commercial crimeware designed to be stitched into hacked or malicious sites and exploit a variety of Web-browser vulnerabilities.

Take one look at the newest kit on the block — “Blackhole” — and it is obvious that Java vulnerabilities continue to give attackers the most mileage and profit, and have surpassed Adobe flaws as the most successful exploit vehicles.

I spoke briefly via instant message with the developer of this Blackhole kit (pictured at right), and he assured me that these images were taken from a working installation. The screen shot here shows the administration panel for this exploit pack, which lists the number of hits (хиты) and downloads (загрузки). The statistics show that on average this kit finds a working exploit that it can use to install malicious software on a visiting host about 10 percent of the time.

Granted, as exploit pack administration pages go, this one is very young (13,289 hits at the time this screen shot was taken), but already some patterns emerge from the data. For example, we can see that Java vulnerabilities are by far the most useful, comprising more than 90 percent of all successful exploits.

This pattern is not confined to Blackhole. Have a look at the following three screen shots, taken from the exploit results pages of three different working installations of SEO Sploit Pack, another common exploit kit. All three screen shots clearly show Java vulnerabilities are the most productive, accounting for between 50 and 65 percent of malware installs or “loads” (thanks to Malwaredomainlist.com for help on this).

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