May, 2019


7
May 19

What’s Behind the Wolters Kluwer Tax Outage?

Early in the afternoon on Friday, May, 3, I asked a friend to relay a message to his security contact at CCH, the cloud-based tax division of the global information services firm Wolters Kluwer in the Netherlands. The message was that the same file directories containing new versions of CCH’s software were open and writable by any anonymous user, and that there were suspicious files in those directories indicating some user(s) abused that access.

Shortly after that report, the CCH file directory for tax software downloads was taken offline. As of this publication, several readers have reported outages affecting multiple CCH Web sites. These same readers reported being unable to access their clients’ tax data in CCH’s cloud because of the ongoing outages. A Reddit thread is full of theories.

One of the many open and writable directories on CCH’s site before my report on Friday.

I do not have any information on whether my report about the world-writable file server had anything to do with the outages going on now at CCH. Nor did I see any evidence that any client data was exposed on the site.

What I did see in those CCH directories were a few odd PHP and text files, including one that seemed to be promoting two different and unrelated Russian language discussion forums.

I sent Wolters Kluwer an email asking how long the file server had been so promiscuous (allowing anyone to upload files to the server), and what the company was doing to validate the integrity of the software made available for download by CCH tax customers.

Marisa Westcott, vice president of marketing and communications at Wolters Kluwer, told KrebsOnSecurity on Friday that she would “check with the team to see if we can get some answers to your questions.”

But subsequent emails and phone calls have gone unreturned. Calls to the company’s main support number (800-739-9998) generate the voice message, “We are currently experiencing technical difficulties. Please try your call again later.”

On Tuesday morning, Wolters Kluwer released an update on the extensive outage via Twitter, saying:

“Since yesterday, May 6, we are experiencing network and service interruptions affecting certain Wolters Kluwer platforms and applications. Out of an abundance of caution, we proactively took offline a number of other applications and we immediately began our investigation and remediation efforts. The secure use of our products and services is our top priority. we have ben able to restore network and services for a number – but not all — of our systems.”

Accounting Today reports today that a PR representative from Wolters Kluwer Tax & Accounting, which makes the CCH products, confirmed the outage was the result of a malware attack: Continue reading →


3
May 19

Feds Bust Up Dark Web Hub Wall Street Market

Federal investigators in the United States, Germany and the Netherlands announced today the arrest and charging of three German nationals and a Brazilian man as the alleged masterminds behind the Wall Street Market (WSM), one of the world’s largest dark web bazaars that allowed vendors to sell illegal drugs, counterfeit goods and malware. Now, at least one former WSM administrator is reportedly trying to extort money from WSM vendors and buyers (supposedly including Yours Truly) — in exchange for not publishing details of the transactions.

The now-defunct Wall Street Market (WSM). Image: Dark Web Reviews.

A complaint filed Wednesday in Los Angeles alleges that the three defendants, who currently are in custody in Germany, were the administrators of WSM, a sophisticated online marketplace available in six languages that allowed approximately 5,400 vendors to sell illegal goods to about 1.15 million customers around the world.

“Like other dark web marketplaces previously shut down by authorities – Silk Road and AlphaBay, for example – WSM functioned like a conventional e-commerce website, but it was a hidden service located beyond the reach of traditional internet browsers, accessible only through the use of networks designed to conceal user identities, such as the Tor network,” reads a Justice Department release issued Friday morning.

The complaint alleges that for nearly three years, WSM was operated on the dark web by three men who engineered an “exit scam” last month, absconding with all of the virtual currency held in marketplace escrow and user accounts. Prosecutors say they believe approximately $11 million worth of virtual currencies was then diverted into the three men’s own accounts.

The defendants charged in the United States and arrested Germany on April 23 and 24 include 23-year-old resident of Kleve, Germany; a 31-year-old resident of Wurzburg, Germany; and a 29-year-old resident of Stuttgart, Germany. The complaint charges the men with two felony counts – conspiracy to launder monetary instruments, and distribution and conspiracy to distribute controlled substances. These three defendants also face charges in Germany.

Signs of the dark market seizure first appeared Thursday when WSM’s site was replaced by a banner saying it had been seized by the German Federal Criminal Police Office (BKA).

The seizure message that replaced the homepage of the Wall Street Market on on May 2.

Writing for ZDNet’s Zero Day blog, Catalin Cimpanu noted that “in this midst of all of this, one of the site’s moderators –named Med3l1n— began blackmailing WSM vendors and buyers, asking for 0.05 Bitcoin (~$280), and threatening to disclose to law enforcement the details of WSM vendors and buyers who made the mistake of sharing various details in support requests in an unencrypted form.

In a direct message sent to my Twitter account this morning, a Twitter user named @FerucciFrances who claimed to be part of the exit scam demanded 0.05 bitcoin (~$286) to keep quiet about a transaction or transactions allegedly made in my name on the dark web market. Continue reading →


3
May 19

Credit Union Sues Fintech Giant Fiserv Over Security Claims

A Pennsylvania credit union is suing financial industry technology giant Fiserv, alleging that “baffling” security vulnerabilities in the company’s software are “wreaking havoc” on its customers. The credit union said the investigation that fueled the lawsuit was prompted by a 2018 KrebsOnSecurity report about glaring security weaknesses in a Fiserv platform that exposed personal and financial details of customers across hundreds of bank Web sites.

Brookfield, Wisc.-based Fiserv [NASDAQ:FISV] is a Fortune 500 company with 24,000 employees and $5.8 billion in earnings last year. Its account and transaction processing systems power the Web sites for hundreds of financial institutions — mostly small community banks and credit unions.

In August 2018, in response to inquiries by KrebsOnSecurity, Fiserv fixed a pervasive security and privacy hole in its online banking platform. The authentication weakness allowed bank customers to view account data for other customers, including account number, balance, phone numbers and email addresses.

In late April 2019, Fiserv was sued by Bessemer System Federal Credit Union, a comparatively tiny financial institution with just $38 million in assets. Bessemer said it was moved by that story to launch its own investigation into Fiserv’s systems, and it found a startlingly simple flaw: Firsev’s platform would let anyone reset the online banking password for a customer just by knowing their account number and the last four digits of their Social Security number.

Bessemer claims Fiserv’s systems let anyone reset a customer’s online banking password just by knowing their SSN and account number.

Recall that in my Aug 2018 report, Fiserv’s own systems were exposing online banking account numbers for its customers. Thus, an attacker would only need to know the last four digits of a target’s SSN to reset that customer’s password, according to Bessemer. And that information is for sale in multiple places online and in the cybercrime underground for a few bucks per person.

Bessemer further alleges Fiserv’s systems had no checks in place to prevent automated attacks that might let thieves rapidly guess the last four digits of the customer’s SSN — such as limiting the number of times a user can submit a login request, or imposing a waiting period after a certain number of failed login attempts.

The lawsuit says the fix Fiserv scrambled to put in place after Bessemer complained was “pitifully deficient and ineffective:”

“Fiserv attempted to fortify Bessemer’s online banking website by requiring users registering for an account to supply a member’s house number. This was ineffective because residential street addresses can be readily found on the internet and through other public sources. Moreover, this information can be guessed through a trial-and-error process. Most alarmingly, this security control was purely illusory. Because some servers were not enforcing this security check, it could be readily bypassed.”

Continue reading →