Posts Tagged: BestAV

Aug 11

Fake Antivirus Industry Down, But Not Out

Many fake antivirus businesses that paid hackers to foist junk security software on PC users have closed up shop in recent weeks. The wave of closures comes amid heightened scrutiny by the industry from security experts and a host of international law enforcement officials. But it’s probably too soon to break out the bubbly: The inordinate profits that drive fake AV peddlers guarantee the market will soon rebound.

During the past few weeks, some top fake AV promotion programs either disappeared or complained of difficulty in processing credit card transactions for would-be scareware victims: Fake AV brands such as Gagarincash, Gizmo, Nailcash, Best AV, Blacksoftware and either ceased operating or alerted affiliates that they may not be paid for current and future installations.

A notice to BestAV affiliates

On July 2, BestAV, one of the larger fake AV distribution networks, told affiliates that unforeseen circumstances had conspired to ruin the moneymaking program for everyone.

“Dear advertisers: Last week was quite complicated. Well-known force majeure circumstances have led to significant sums of money hanging in the banks, or in processing, making it impossible to pay advertisers on time and in full.”

The disruption appears to be partially due to an international law enforcement push against the fake AV industry. In one recent operation, authorities seized computers and servers in the United States and seven other countries in an ongoing investigation of a hacking gang that stole $72 million by tricking people into buying fake AV.

There may be another reason for the disruption: On June 23, Russian police arrested Pavel Vrublevsky, the co-founder of Russian online payment giant ChronoPay and a major player in the fake AV market.

Black Market Breakdown

ChronoPay employees wait outside as Moscow police search the premises.

Vrublevsky was arrested for allegedly hiring a hacker to launch denial of service attacks against ChronoPay’s rivals in the payments processing business. His role as a pioneer in the fake AV industry has been well-documented on this blog and elsewhere.

In May, I wrote about evidence showing that ChronoPay employees were involved in pushing MacDefender — fake AV software targeting Mac users. ChronoPay later issued a statement denying it had any involvement in the MacDefender scourge.

But last week, Russian cops who raided ChronoPay’s offices in Moscow found otherwise. According to a source who was involved in the raid, police found mountains of evidence that ChronoPay employees were running technical and customer support for a variety of fake AV programs, including MacDefender. The photograph below was taken by police on the scene who discovered Website support credentials and the call records of 1-800 numbers used to operate the support centers.

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Jul 11

Azeri Banks Corner Fake AV, Pharma Market

Banks in Azerbaijan that have courted the shadowy trade in spam-advertised pharmaceuticals now have cornered the market for processing credit card payments for fake antivirus software, new data reveals.

In June, KrebsOnSecurity highlighted research from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) showing that Azerigazbank, a financial institution in Azerbaijan, was the primary merchant bank for most major online-fraud pharmacy affiliate programs. By the time that research was published, those programs had moved their business to another bank in Azerbaijan, JSCB Bank Standard.

Earlier this month, researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) revealed that three of the most popular fake AV affiliate services — which pay hackers to foist worthless software on clueless Internet users — processed tens of millions of dollars in payments through Bank Standard and the International Bank of Azerbaijan.

UCSD researcher Damon McCoy has been making targeted “buys” at dozens of fake AV sites, trying to identify their partner banks. The fake AV operations that McCoy follows are distinct from those in the UCSB research; the UCSB team asked that the names of the rogue AV programs they infiltrated not be published, citing ongoing law enforcement investigations.

A popular fraud forum features a banner ad recruiting affiliates for BestAV

In late 2010, McCoy began buying rogue antivirus software from fake AV affiliate businesses BestAV and Gagarincash — the latter named after Yuri Gagarin, the Russian cosmonaut who was the first man launched into space. McCoy said both fake AV operations previously used Bank Standard, but within the past month have switched to the International Bank of Azerbaijan.

McCoy also tracked a more elusive fake AV affiliate program that he calls Win7Security, after the program’s most profitable brand of fake AV. McCoy said that for the past several months he’d lost track of Win7Security, and hadn’t seen any of its sites being pimped in the usual places, such as malware-laced banner ads and booby-trapped Web sites that redirect users to fake AV sites.

Recently, I heard from a source that stumbled upon a portion of the customer database for a payment processing firm¬† It’s not clear where this company is based; it claims to have offices in Russia, New York and the United Kingdom, but neither NY nor the UK has any record of that company, and the company did not respond to requests for comment. The database indicates that a large number of fake AV Web sites were using to process payments (a partial list is here).

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