Posts Tagged: comerica


25
Jul 11

Calif. Co. Sues Bank Over $465k eBanking Heist

A California real estate escrow company that lost more than $465,000 in an online banking heist last year is suing its former financial institution, alleging that the bank was negligent and that it failed to live up to the terms of its own online banking contract.

The plight of Redondo Beach, Calif. based Village View Escrow, first publicized by KrebsOnSecurity last summer, began in March 2010. That’s when organized crooks broke into the firm’s computers and bank accounts, and sent 26 consecutive wire transfers to 20 individuals around the world who had no legitimate business with the firm.

Village View’s bank, Professional Business Bank of Pasadena, Calif., relied on third-party service provider NetTeller, which allowed commercial customers to authenticate to the bank’s site with little more than a username and password. Village View’s contract with Professional Bank stated that electronic transfers would only be allowed if they were authorized by two Village View employees, and confirmed by a call from specific Village View phone numbers.

The attack on Village View demonstrates the sophistication of malicious software like the ZeuS Trojan. The thieves disguised a banking Trojan as a UPS shipping receipt, and the company’s owner acknowledged opening the attachment and forwarding it to another employee who also viewed the malware-laced file. Once inside Village View’s systems, the attackers apparently disabled email notifications from the bank.

Nevertheless, Village View’s lawsuit challenges Professional Bank’s claims that its systems used “multi-factor,” and “state-0f-the-art” ebanking systems, and accuses the bank of negligence for not having procedures to help the company recover the fraudulent transfers.

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17
Jun 11

Court Favors Small Business in eBanking Fraud Case

Comerica Bank is liable for more than a half a million dollars stolen in a 2009 cyber heist against a small business, a Michigan court ruled. Experts say the decision is likely to spur additional lawsuits from other victims that have been closely watching the case.

Judge Patrick J. Duggan found that Dallas-based Comerica failed to act “in good faith” in January 2009, when it processed almost 100 wire transfers within a few hours from the account of Experi-Metal Inc. (EMI), a custom metals shop based in Sterling Heights, Mich. The transfers that were not recovered amounted to $560,000.

“A bank dealing fairly with its customer, under these circumstances, would have detected and/or stopped the fraudulent wire activity earlier,” Duggan wrote. Judge Duggan has yet to decide how much Comerica will have to pay.

The problems for Experi-Metal started when company controller Keith Maslowski responded to an e-mail that appeared to be from its bank, Comerica. The message said the bank needed to carry out scheduled maintenance on its banking software, and instructed the EMI employee to log in at a Web site that appeared to be Comerica’s online banking site. Maslowski said the email resembled the annual e-mails Comerica used to send, prompting customers to renew EMI’s digital certificates.

The year before the cyber theft, Comerica had switched from using digital certificates to requiring commercial customers to enter a one-time passcode from a security token. The site linked to in the e-mail asked for that code, and Maslowski complied. Within the span of a few hours, the attackers made 97 wire transfers from EMI’s account to bank accounts in China, Estonia, Finland, Russia and Scotland.

Comerica became aware of the fraudulent transfers four hours after the attack began. Although it took steps to isolate Experi-Metal’s account, the bank also failed to stop more than a dozen additional fraudulent transfers from the company’s account after the bank’s initial response. Experi-Metal sued the bank after it refused to cover any of the losses.

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8
Feb 10

Comerica Phish Foiled 2-Factor Protection

A metals supply company in Michigan is suing its bank for poor security practices after a successful phishing attack against an employee allowed thieves to steal more than half a million dollars last year.

Experi-Metal sells metal stampings, trim moldings and specialty items.

The lawsuit, filed by Experi-Metal Inc. (EMI), in Sterling Heights, Mich., charges that Dallas-based Comerica Bank effectively groomed its customers to become phishing victims by routinely sending them e-mail messages that asked recipients to click a link to update the bank’s security technology. The company also alleges that Comerica’s security protections for customers are not commercially reasonable, because the phishing scam routed around the bank’s 2-factor authentication system.

According to a complaint EMI filed in December with a Michigan circuit court, for many years Comerica used “digital certificates” for authenticating online banking customers. Digital certificates are the browser-based counterparts to ATM cards, and many banks require customers to include the bank’s cryptographically signed digital certificate in their browser before the bank’s online system will allow users access.

Once a year from 2000 to 2008, Comerica sent emails to EMI and other customers directing them to click on a link in the email, and then log in at the resulting Web site in order to renew the digital certificate that Comerica required.

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