Posts Tagged: Kathleen A. Pitton

Jun 11

Court Favors Small Business in eBanking Fraud Case

Comerica Bank is liable for more than a half a million dollars stolen in a 2009 cyber heist against a small business, a Michigan court ruled. Experts say the decision is likely to spur additional lawsuits from other victims that have been closely watching the case.

Judge Patrick J. Duggan found that Dallas-based Comerica failed to act “in good faith” in January 2009, when it processed almost 100 wire transfers within a few hours from the account of Experi-Metal Inc. (EMI), a custom metals shop based in Sterling Heights, Mich. The transfers that were not recovered amounted to $560,000.

“A bank dealing fairly with its customer, under these circumstances, would have detected and/or stopped the fraudulent wire activity earlier,” Duggan wrote. Judge Duggan has yet to decide how much Comerica will have to pay.

The problems for Experi-Metal started when company controller Keith Maslowski responded to an e-mail that appeared to be from its bank, Comerica. The message said the bank needed to carry out scheduled maintenance on its banking software, and instructed the EMI employee to log in at a Web site that appeared to be Comerica’s online banking site. Maslowski said the email resembled the annual e-mails Comerica used to send, prompting customers to renew EMI’s digital certificates.

The year before the cyber theft, Comerica had switched from using digital certificates to requiring commercial customers to enter a one-time passcode from a security token. The site linked to in the e-mail asked for that code, and Maslowski complied. Within the span of a few hours, the attackers made 97 wire transfers from EMI’s account to bank accounts in China, Estonia, Finland, Russia and Scotland.

Comerica became aware of the fraudulent transfers four hours after the attack began. Although it took steps to isolate Experi-Metal’s account, the bank also failed to stop more than a dozen additional fraudulent transfers from the company’s account after the bank’s initial response. Experi-Metal sued the bank after it refused to cover any of the losses.

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