Posts Tagged: HD Moore

Sep 12

Internet Explorer Users: Please Read This

Microsoft is urging Windows users who browse the Web with Internet Explorer to use a free tool called EMET to block attacks against a newly-discovered and unpatched critical security hole in IE versions 7, 8 and 9. But some experts say that advice falls short, and that users can better protect themselves by surfing with an alternative browser until Microsoft issues a proper patch for the vulnerability.

The application page of EMET.

EMET, short for the Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit, is a tool that can help Windows users beef up the security of commonly used applications, whether they are made by a third-party vendor or by Microsoft. EMET allows users to force applications to use one or both of two key security defenses built into Windows Vista and Windows 7 — Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR) and Data Execution Prevention (DEP).

Put very simply, DEP is designed to make it harder to exploit security vulnerabilities on Windows, and ASLR makes it more difficult for exploits and malware to find the specific places in a system’s memory that they need to do their dirty work.

Before I get into the how-tos on EMET, a few caveats. EMET is a great layer of security that Windows users can and should use to enhance the security of applications. But EMET may not block the exploit code now publicly available through the Metasploit framework. In fact, Tod Beardlsey, an engineering manager with Rapid7, the security firm that manages Metasploit, told The Associated Press that EMET does not appear to be completely effective against this exploit.

I asked Metasploit founder HD Moore what he thought was the best way to block this exploit, and he pointed out that the exploit available through Metasploit requires the presence of Java on the host machine in order to execute properly on IE 8/9 on Windows 7 and Vista systems (the exploit works fine without Java against IE7 on XP/Vista and IE8 on XP). Obviously, while the lack of Java on a Windows machine may not prevent other exploits against this flaw, it is a great first start. I have consistently urged computer users of all stripes to uninstall Java if they have no specific use for it.

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Jul 12

How to Break Into Security, Bejtlich Edition

For this fourth installment of advice columns aimed at people who are interested in learning more about security as a craft or profession, I reached out to Richard Bejtlich, a prominent security blogger who last year moved from a job as director of incident response at General Electric to chief security officer at security forensics firm Mandiant.

Bejtlich responded with a practical how-to for a security novice looking to try on both attacker and defender hats. Without further ado…

Bejtlich: Providing advice on “getting started in digital security” is similar to providing advice on “getting started in medicine.” If you ask a neurosurgeon he or she may propose some sort of experiment with dead frog legs and batteries. If you ask a dermatologist you might get advice on protection from the sun whenever you go outside. Asking a “security person” will likewise result in many different responses, depending on the individual’s background and tastes.

Rather than try to devise a thorough curriculum that provides balanced coverage of the dozen or more distinct disciplines that one might call “digital security,” this article covers one aspect: magic. More specifically, this advice strives to dispel the notion that digital security is a realm where only magicians can perform superhuman feats involving computers and data. Rather, the point is to provide a way for beginners to get a feel for convincing a computer to take actions probably not expected by its original programmers. For those with a more technical inclination, the article provides a means to watch what is happening at the network level.

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Mar 12

Hackers Offer Bounty for Windows RDP Exploit

A Web site that bills itself as a place where independent and open source software developers can hire each other has secured promises to award at least $1,435 to the first person who can develop a working exploit that takes advantage of newly disclosed and dangerous security hole in all supported versions of Microsoft Windows.

That reward, which is sure to only increase with each passing day, is offered to any developer who can devise an exploit for one of two critical vulnerabilities that Microsoft patched on Tuesday in its Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP is designed as a way to let administrators control and configure machines remotely over a network).

Update, 8:47 a.m.: The RDP exploit may already be available. There are unconfirmed reports that a working exploit for the RDP bug has been posted to Chinese-language forums.

Original post:

The bounty comes courtesy of contributors to (pronounced gun-yo), a site that advances free and open software. The current bounty offered for the exploit is almost certainly far less than the price such a weapon could command the underground market, or even what a legitimate vulnerability research company like TippingPoint might pay for such research. But the site shows promise for organizing a grassroots effort at crafting exploits that can be used by attackers and defenders alike to test the security of desktops and the networks in which they run.

“We’re trying to advance the culture of independent software development – so we’ve made a place where indie developers can find other devs to help work on their projects and find gigs to work on when they need cash,” explains on the About section of the site. is the brainchild of Rich Jones, a 23-year-old Bostonite who just moved to Berkeley, Calif. Most recently, Jones ran a research P2P project called Anomos, which is an anonymous variant of the BitTorrent protocol. He also runs the OpenWatch Project, which uses mobile technology as a way of surveilling the police and other people in positions of power.

“I started after working for a few years as a freelance developer and open source programmer,” Jones said in an email interview. “I wanted a way to get high quality, short term freelance jobs while also continuing to contribute back to the open source community. I’m particularly interested in the things that happen when people pool their money together, so we provide a free group fundraising platform for open source projects.” quietly launched about six months ago, and has already gained thousands of contributors. Until this week it had never offered a bounty for a software exploit, Jones said. Continue reading →