Posts Tagged: Nuclear Exploit Kit

Feb 16

Good Riddance to Oracle’s Java Plugin

Good news: Oracle says the next major version of its Java software will no longer plug directly into the user’s Web browser. This long overdue step should cut down dramatically on the number of computers infected with malicious software via opportunistic, so-called “drive-by” download attacks that exploit outdated Java plugins across countless browsers and multiple operating systems.

javamessAccording to Oracle, some 97 percent of enterprise computers and a whopping 89 percent of desktop systems in the U.S. run some form of Java. This has made Java JRE (the form of Java that runs most commonly on end-user systems) a prime target of malware authors.

“Exploit kits,” crimeware made to be stitched into the fabric of hacked and malicious sites, lie in wait for visitors who browse the booby-trapped sites. The kits can silently install malicious software on computers of anyone visiting or forcibly redirected to booby-trapped sites without the latest version of the Java plugin installed. In addition, crooks are constantly trying to inject scripts that invoke exploit kits via tainted advertisements submitted to the major ad networks.

These exploit kits — using names like “Angler,” “Blackhole,” “Nuclear” and “Rig” — are equipped to try a kitchen sink full of exploits for various browser plugins, but historically most of those exploits have been attacks on outdated Java and Adobe Flash plugins. As a result, KrebsOnSecurity has long warned users to remove Java altogether, or at least unplug it from the browser unless and until it is needed.

On Jan. 27, 2016, Oracle took a major step toward reducing the effectiveness of exploit kits and other crimeware when the company announced it was pulling the browser plugin from the next desktop version of Java – Java JRE 9. Continue reading →

Jul 15

Adobe To Fix Another Hacking Team Zero-Day

For the second time in a week, Adobe Systems Inc. says it plans fix a zero-day vulnerability in its Flash Player software that came to light after hackers broke into and posted online hundreds of gigabytes of data from Hacking Team, a controversial Italian company that’s long been accused of helping repressive regimes spy on dissident groups.

brokenflash-aIn an advisory published late Friday evening, Adobe said it plans to issue another Flash patch the week of July 13, 2015. “This vulnerability was reported to us following further investigation of the data published after the Hacking Team data breach,” the advisory notes.

Adobe said the flaw is present in the latest version of Flash for Windows, Mac and Linux systems, and that code showing attackers how to exploit this flaw is already available online.

There is every reason to believe this exploit will soon be folded into exploit kits, crimeware used to foist drive-by downloads when unsuspecting visitors browse to a hacked or booby-trapped site. On Wednesday, Adobe patched a different vulnerability in Flash that was exposed in the Hacking Team breach, but not before code designed to attack the flaw was folded into the Angler and Nuclear exploit kits.

If you were on the fence about removing or disabling Flash altogether, now would be a great time to reconsider. I recently blogged about my experience doing just that, and found I didn’t miss the program much at all after a month without it.