Posts Tagged: Perkele


19
Aug 13

A Closer Look: Perkele Android Malware Kit

In March 2013 I wrote about Perkele, a crimeware kit designed to create malware for Android phones that can help defeat multi-factor authentication used by many banks. In this post, we’ll take a closer look at this threat, examining the malware as it is presented to the would-be victim as well as several back-end networks set up by cybercrooks who have been using mobile bots to fleece banks and their customers.

Perkele disguises itself as an various Android security applications and certiifcates.

Perkele disguises itself as various Android security applications and certificates.

Perkele is sold for $1,000, and it’s made to interact with a wide variety of malware already resident on a victim’s PC. When a victim visits his bank’s Web site, the Trojan (be it Zeus or Citadel or whatever) injects malicious code into the victim’s browser, prompting the user to enter his mobile information, including phone number and OS type.

That information is relayed back to the attacker’s control server, which injects more code into the victim’s browser prompting him to scan a QR code with his mobile device to install an additional security mechanism.

Once the victim scans the QR code, the Perkele malware is downloaded and installed, allowing the attackers to intercept incoming SMS messages sent to that phone. At that point, the malware on the victim’s PC automatically initiates a financial transaction from the victim’s account.

When the bank sends an SMS with a one-time code, Perkele intercepts that code and sends it to the attacker’s control server. Then the malicious script on the victim’s PC receives the code and completes the unauthorized transaction.

Web site security firm Versafe located a server that was being used to host malicious scripts tied to at least one Perkele operation. The company produced this report (PDF), which delves a bit deeper into the behavior and network activity generated by the crimeware kit.

Versafe’s report includes several screenshots of the Perkele application as offered to would-be victims. The malware is presented as a security certificate; it’s named “zertificate” because the victim in this case banked at a German financial institution.

Perkele disguised as a security certificate for a German bank. Source: Versafe.

Perkele disguised as a security certificate for a German bank. Source: Versafe.

A few weeks ago, I encountered the back end system for what appears to be a Perkele distribution, or perhaps some other mobile malware bot; I should note that disguising an Android banking Trojan as a security certificate is not a ruse that’s limited to Perkele: The Pincert SMS malware also employs this trick, according to F-Secure.

Anyhow, I scarcely had time to examine this particular mobile bot control panel before it was either taken down by German authorities or was moved elsewhere by the fraudsters. But it, too, was intercepting one-time codes from German banking victims using an Android malware component similarly disguised as a “zertificate.”

This Android SMS bot control panel targeted German bank customers.

This Android SMS bot control panel targeted German bank customers.

Apparently, it was fairly successful, stealing one-time codes from online banking customers of several German financial institutions, including Postbank and Comdirect.

Dozens of German banking customers were victimized by this Android bot control panel.

Dozens of German banking customers were victimized by this Android bot control panel.

In the screen grab below, we can see the main administrative page of this panel, which controls which banks should be targeted and from where the fraudulent text messages should be sent.

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6
Mar 13

Mobile Malcoders Pay to (Google) Play

An explosion in malware targeting Android users is being fueled in part by a budding market for mobile malcode creation kits, as well as a brisk market for hijacked or fraudulent developer accounts at Google Play that can be used to disguise malware as legitimate apps for sale.

An Underweb ad for Perkele

An Underweb ad for Perkele

I recently encountered an Android malware developer on a semi-private Underweb forum who was actively buying up verified developer accounts at Google Play for $100 apiece. Google charges just $25 for Android developers who wish to sell their applications through the Google Play marketplace, but it also requires the accounts to be approved and tied to a specific domain. The buyer in this case is offering $100 for sellers willing to part with an active, verified Play account that  is tied to a dedicated server.

Unsurprisingly, this particular entrepreneur also sells an Android SMS malware package that targets customers of Citibank, HSBC and ING, as well as 66 other financial institutions in Australia, France, India, Italy, Germany, New Zealand, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland and Turkey (the complete list is here). The targeted banks offer text messages as a form of multi-factor authentication, and this bot is designed to intercept all incoming SMS messages on infected Android phones.

This bot kit — dubbed “Perkele” by a malcoder who goes by the same nickname (‘perkele’ is a Finnish curse word for “devil” or “damn”) — does not appear to be terribly diabolical or sophisticated as modern mobile malware goes. Still, judging from the number and reputation of forum buyers who endorsed Perkele’s malware, it appears quite popular and to perform as advertised.

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