Posts Tagged: WPS


9
Jan 15

Lizard Stresser Runs on Hacked Home Routers

The online attack service launched late last year by the same criminals who knocked Sony and Microsoft’s gaming networks offline over the holidays is powered mostly by thousands of hacked home Internet routers, KrebsOnSecurity.com has discovered.

Just days after the attacks on Sony and Microsoft, a group of young hoodlums calling themselves the Lizard Squad took responsibility for the attack and announced the whole thing was merely an elaborate commercial for their new “booter” or “stresser” site — a service designed to help paying customers knock virtually any site or person offline for hours or days at a time. As it turns out, that service draws on Internet bandwidth from hacked home Internet routers around the globe that are protected by little more than factory-default usernames and passwords.

The Lizard Stresser's add-on plans. In case it wasn't clear, this service is *not* sponsored by Brian Krebs.

The Lizard Stresser’s add-on plans. Despite this site’s claims, it is *not* sponsored by this author.

In the first few days of 2015, KrebsOnSecurity was taken offline by a series of large and sustained denial-of-service attacks apparently orchestrated by the Lizard Squad. As I noted in a previous story, the booter service — lizardstresser[dot]su — is hosted at an Internet provider in Bosnia that is home to a large number of malicious and hostile sites.

That provider happens to be on the same “bulletproof” hosting network advertised by “sp3c1alist,” the administrator of the cybercrime forum Darkode. Until a few days ago, Darkode and LizardStresser shared the same Internet address. Interestingly, one of the core members of the Lizard Squad is an individual who goes by the nickname “Sp3c.”

On Jan. 4, KrebsOnSecurity discovered the location of the malware that powers the botnet. Hard-coded inside of that malware was the location of the LizardStresser botnet controller, which happens to be situated in the same small swath Internet address space occupied by the LizardStresser Web site (217.71.50.x)

The malicious code that converts vulnerable systems into stresser bots is a variation on a piece of rather crude malware first documented in November by Russian security firm Dr. Web, but the malware itself appears to date back to early 2014 (Google’s Chrome browser should auto-translate that page; for others, a Google-translated copy of the Dr. Web writeup is here).

As we can see in that writeup, in addition to turning the infected host into attack zombies, the malicious code uses the infected system to scan the Internet for additional devices that also allow access via factory default credentials, such as “admin/admin,” or “root/12345”. In this way, each infected host is constantly trying to spread the infection to new home routers and other devices accepting incoming connections (via telnet) with default credentials.

The botnet is not made entirely of home routers; some of the infected hosts appear to be commercial routers at universities and companies, and there are undoubtedly other devices involved. The preponderance of routers represented in the botnet probably has to do with the way that the botnet spreads and scans for new potential hosts. But there is no reason the malware couldn’t spread to a wide range of devices powered by the Linux operating system, including desktop servers and Internet-connected cameras. Continue reading →


29
Dec 11

New Tools Bypass Wireless Router Security

Security researchers have released new tools that can bypass the encryption used to protect many types of wireless routers. Ironically, the tools take advantage of design flaws in a technology pushed by the wireless industry that was intended to make the security features of modern routers easier to use.

At issue is a technology called “Wi-Fi Protected Setup” (WPS) that ships with many routers marketed to consumers and small businesses. According to the Wi-Fi Alliance, an industry group, WPS is “designed to ease the task of setting up and configuring security on wireless local area networks. WPS enables typical users who possess little understanding of traditional Wi-Fi configuration and security settings to automatically configure new wireless networks, add new devices and enable security.”

Setting up a home wireless network to use encryption traditionally involved navigating a confusing array of Web-based menus, selecting from a jumble of geeky-sounding and ill-explained encryption options (WEP, WPA, WPA2, TKIP, AES), and then repeating many of those procedures on the various wireless devices the user wants to connect to the network. To make matters worse, many wireless routers come with little or no instructions on how to set up encryption.

Enter WPS. Wireless routers with WPS built-in ship with a personal identification number (PIN – usually 8 digits) printed on them. Using WPS, the user can enable strong encryption for the wireless network simply by pushing a button on the router and then entering the PIN in a network setup wizard designed to interact with the router.

But according to new research, routers with WPS are vulnerable to a very basic hacking technique: The brute-force attack. Put simply, an attacker can try thousands of combinations in rapid succession until he happens on the correct 8-digit PIN that allows authentication to the device.

One way to protect against such automated attacks is to disallow authentication for a specified amount of time after a certain number of unsuccessful attempts. Stefan Viehböck, a freelance information security researcher, said some wireless access point makers implemented such an approach. The problem, he said, is that most of the vendors did so in ways that make brute-force attacks slower, but still feasible.

Earlier today, Viehböck released on his site a free tool that he said can be used to duplicate his research and findings, detailed in this paper (PDF). He said his tool took about four hours to test all possible combinations on TP-Link and D-Link routers he examined, and less than 24 hours against a Netgear router.

“The Wi-Fi alliance members were clearly opting for usability” over security, Viehböck said in a instant message conversation with KrebsOnSecurity.com. “It is very unlikely that nobody noticed that the way they designed the protocol makes a brute force attack easier than it ever should.”

Continue reading →