Posts Tagged: diebold

Feb 16

Skimmers Hijack ATM Network Cables

If you have ever walked up to an ATM to withdraw cash only to decide against it after noticing a telephone or ethernet cord snaking from behind the machine to a jack in the wall, your paranoia may not have been misplaced: ATM maker NCR is warning about skimming attacks that involve keypad overlays, hidden cameras and skimming devices plugged into the ATM network cables to intercept customer card data.

Two network cable card skimming devices, as found attached to this ATM.

Two network cable card skimming devices, as found attached to this ATM.

In an alert sent to customers Feb. 8, NCR said it received reliable reports of NCR and Diebold ATMs being attacked through the use of external skimming devices that hijack the cash machine’s phone or Internet jack.

“These devices are plugged into the ATM network cables and intercept customer card data. Additional devices are attached to the ATM to capture the PIN,” NCR warned. “A keyboard overlay was used to attack an NCR ATM, a concealed camera was used on the Diebold ATM. PIN data is then likely transmitted wirelessly to the skimming device.”

The ATM maker believes these attacks represent a continuation of the trend where criminals are finding alternative methods to skim magnetic strip cards. Such alternative methods avoid placing the skimmer on the ATM card entry bezel, which is where most anti-skimming technology is located.

NCR said cash machine operators must consider all points where card data may be accessible — in addition to the traditional point of vulnerability at the card entry bezel — and that having ATM network communications cables and connections exposed in publicly accessible locations only invites trouble. Continue reading →

Apr 11

ATM Skimmers: Hacking the Cash Machine

Most of the ATM skimmers I’ve profiled in this blog are comprised of parts designed to mimic and to fit on top of existing cash machine components, such as card acceptance slots or PIN pads. But sometimes, skimmer thieves find success by swapping out ATM parts with compromised look-alikes.

ATM Card skimmer, using modified ATM component

ATM Card skimmer, using modified ATM component

On May 16, 2009, a company representative from ATM maker Diebold was servicing an ATM at a Bank of America branch in Sun Valley, Calif., when he discovered a skimming device and a camera that were attached to the machine. The technician took pictures of the camera and card skimmer (click picture at right for larger image), and then went into the branch to contact his supervisor.

But when the Diebold employee returned, the camera had been removed from the ATM, suggesting that the skimmer scammer was lurking somewhere nearby and had swooped in to salvage his remaining equipment. This is similar to what happened when an ATM technician discovered a compromised ATM a year ago.

Investigators of the present scam learned that the thief had somehow pried off the plastic cover of the ATM’s card acceptance slot and replaced it with an identical, compromised version that included a modified magnetic stripe reader and a flash storage device. The new card slot came with its own clear plastic face that was situated in front of the plastic one that was already attached to the ATM’s internal card reader (see picture below). The entire fraudulent device was glued onto the ATM with silicon.

Real card reader and skimmer overlayBelow are a few close-ups of the silicon-based magnetic stripe reader attached to the compromised card acceptance slot overlay.

A close-up of an ATM card skimmer

A close-up of an ATM card reader

Here’s a closer look at the electronics inside this handmade reader:

A close-up of an ATM card skimmer Continue reading →

Nov 10

All-in-One Skimmers

ATM skimmers come in all shapes and sizes, and most include several components — such as a tiny spy cam hidden in a brochure rack, or fraudulent PIN pad overlay.  The problem from the thief’s perspective is that the more components included in the skimmer kit, the greater the chance that he will get busted attaching or removing the devices from ATMs.

Thus, the appeal of the all-in-one ATM skimmer: It stores card data using an integrated magnetic stripe reader, and it has a built-in hidden camera designed to record the PIN sequence after an unsuspecting customer slides his bank card into the compromised machine.

The model displayed here is designed to work on specific Diebold ATMs, and can hold a battery charge for two to four days, depending on ambient temperature and the number of customers who pull money out of the hacked ATM.

Functionally, it is quite similar to the all-in-one model pictured in the very first skimmer post in this ATM skimmer series, although its design indicates it may be identical to the one pictured here, which was found on a Wachovia ATM just a couple of miles from my home earlier this year.

The tiny pinhole camera in the image above is angled so that it points at the PIN pad below and to the left, recording the victim’s 4-digit personal identification number to a flash-based memory card.

Continue reading →