Posts Tagged: Tor


18
Sep 14

Medical Records For Sale in Underground Stolen From Texas Life Insurance Firm

How much are your medical records worth in the cybercrime underground? This week, KrebsOnSecurity discovered medical records being sold in bulk for as little as $6.40 apiece. The digital documents, several of which were obtained by sources working with this publication, were apparently stolen from a Texas-based life insurance company that now says it is working with federal authorities on an investigation into a possible data breach.

The "Fraud Related" section of the Evolution Market.

The “Fraud Related” section of the Evolution Market.

Purloined medical records are among the many illicit goods for sale on the Evolution Market, a black market bazaar that traffics mostly in narcotics and fraud-related goods — including plenty of stolen financial data. Evolution cannot be reached from the regular Internet. Rather, visitors can only browse the site using Tor, software that helps users disguise their identity by bouncing their traffic between different servers, and by encrypting that traffic at every hop along the way.

Last week, a reader alerted this author to a merchant on Evolution Market nicknamed “ImperialRussia” who was advertising medical records for sale. ImperialRussia was hawking his goods as “fullz” — street slang for a package of all the personal and financial records that thieves would need to fraudulently open up new lines of credit in a person’s name.

Each document for sale by this seller includes the would-be identity theft victim’s name, their medical history, address, phone and driver license number, Social Security number, date of birth, bank name, routing number and checking/savings account number. Customers can purchase the records using the digital currency Bitcoin.

A set of five fullz retails for $40 ($8 per record). Buy 20 fullz and the price drops to $7 per record. Purchase 50 or more fullz, and the per record cost falls to just $6.40 — roughly the price of a value meal at a fast food restaurant. Incidentally, even at $8 per record, that’s cheaper than the price most stolen credit cards fetch on the underground markets.

Imperial Russia's ad on Evolution pimping medical and financial records stolen from a Texas life insurance firm.

Imperial Russia’s ad pimping medical and financial records stolen from a Texas life insurance firm.

“Live and Exclusive database of US FULLZ from an insurance company, particularly from NorthWestern region of U.S.,” ImperialRussia’s ad on Evolution enthuses. The pitch continues:

“Most of the fullz come with EXTRA FREEBIES inside as additional policyholders. All of the information is accurate and confirmed. Clients are from an insurance company database with GOOD to EXCELLENT credit score! I, myself was able to apply for credit cards valued from $2,000 – $10,000 with my fullz. Info can be used to apply for loans, credit cards, lines of credit, bank withdrawal, assume identity, account takeover.”

Sure enough, the source who alerted me to this listing had obtained numerous fullz from this seller. All of them contained the personal and financial information on people in the Northwest United States (mostly in Washington state) who’d applied for life insurance through American Income Life, an insurance firm based in Waco, Texas.

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6
Sep 14

Dread Pirate Sunk By Leaky CAPTCHA

Ever since October 2013, when the FBI took down the online black market and drug bazaar known as the Silk Road, privacy activists and security experts have traded conspiracy theories about how the U.S. government managed to discover the geographic location of the Silk Road Web servers. Those systems were supposed to be obscured behind the anonymity service Tor, but as court documents released Friday explain, that wasn’t entirely true: Turns out, the login page for the Silk Road employed an anti-abuse CAPTCHA service that pulled content from the open Internet, thus leaking the site’s true location.

leakyshipTor helps users disguise their identity by bouncing their traffic between different Tor servers, and by encrypting that traffic at every hop along the way. The Silk Road, like many sites that host illicit activity, relied on a feature of Tor known as “hidden services.” This feature allows anyone to offer a Web server without revealing the true Internet address to the site’s users.

That is, if you do it correctly, which involves making sure you aren’t mixing content from the regular open Internet into the fabric of a site protected by Tor. But according to federal investigators,  Ross W. Ulbricht — a.k.a. the “Dread Pirate Roberts,” the 30-year-old arrested last year and charged with running the Silk Road — made this exact mistake. Continue reading →


6
Nov 13

CryptoLocker Crew Ratchets Up the Ransom

Last week’s article about how to prevent CryptoLocker ransomware attacks generated quite a bit of feedback and lots of questions from readers. For some answers — and since the malware itself has morphed significantly in just a few day’s time — I turned to Lawrence Abrams and his online help forum BleepingComputer.com, which have been following and warning about this scourge for several months.

This message is left by CryptoLocker for victims whose antivirus software removed the file needed to pay the ransom.

This message is left by CryptoLocker for victims whose antivirus software removes the file needed to pay the ransom.

To recap, CryptoLocker is a diabolical new twist on an old scam. The malware encrypts all of the most important files on a victim PC — pictures, movie and music files, documents, etc. — as well as any files on attached or networked storage media. CryptoLocker then demands payment via Bitcoin or MoneyPak and installs a countdown clock on the victim’s desktop that ticks backwards from 72 hours. Victims who pay the ransom receive a key that unlocks their encrypted files; those who let the timer expire before paying risk losing access to their files forever.

Or, at least, that’s how it worked up until a few days ago, when the crooks behind this scam began easing their own rules a bit to accommodate victims who were apparently willing to pay up but simply couldn’t jump through all the hoops necessary in the time allotted.

“They realized they’ve been leaving money on the table,” Abrams said. “They decided there’s little sense in not accepting the ransom money a week later if the victim is still willing to pay to get their files back.”

Part of the problem, according to Abrams, is that few victims even know about Bitcoins or MoneyPak, let alone how to obtain or use these payment mechanisms.

“We put up survey and asked how many [victims] had paid the ransom with Bitcoins, and almost no one said they did, Abrams said. “Most paid with MoneyPak. The people who did pay with Bitcoins said they found the process for getting them was so cumbersome that it took them a week to figure it out.”

Another major stumbling block that prevents many otherwise willing victims from paying the ransom is, ironically, antivirus software that detects CryptoLocker — but only after the malware has locked the victim’s most prized files with virtually uncrackable encryption.

“Originally, when antivirus software would clean a computer, it would remove the CryptoLocker infection, which made it so the user could not pay the ransom,” Abrams said. “Newer versions change the desktop background to include a URL where the user can download the infection again and pay the ransom.”

The idea of purposefully re-infecting a machine by downloading and executing highly destructive malware may be antithetical and even heresy to some security pros. But victims who are facing the annihilation of their most precious files probably have a different view of the situation. Abrams that said his testing has shown that as long as the registry key “HKCU\Software\Cryptolocker_0388″ remains in the Windows registry, re-downloading the malware would not try to re-encrypt the already encrypted data — although it would encrypt any new files added since the initial infection.

“Some antivirus companies have been telling victims not to pay the ransom,” Abrams said. “On the one hand, I get it, because you don’t want to encourage these malware writers. But on the other hand, there are some companies that are facing going out of business if they don’t, and can’t afford to take the holier-that-thou route.”

CRYPTOLOCKER DECRYPTION SERVICE

On Friday, Nov. 1, the crooks behind this malware campaign launched a “customer service” feature that they have been promising to debut for weeks: a CryptoLocker Decryption Service. “This service allow [sic] you to purchase private key and decrypter for files encrypted by CryptoLocker,” the site reads. “Customers” of the service can search for their “order number” simply by uploading any of the encrypted files.

“They’re calling it an ‘order,’ as if victims posted an order at Amazon.com,” Abrams said.

The "Cryptolocker Decryption Service."

The “Cryptolocker Decryption Service.”

“If you already purchased private key using CryptoLocker, then you can download private key and decrypter for free,” explains the service, which is currently hosted at one of several addresses on the Tor anonymity network. The decryption service site is not reachable from the regular Internet; rather, victims must first download and install special software to access the site — yet another potential hurdle for victims to jump through.

According to Abrams, victims who are still within the initial 72-hour countdown clock can pay the ransom by coughing up two Bitcoins — or roughly $200 using a MoneyPak order. Victims who cannot pay within 72 hours can still get their files back, but for that unfortunate lot the ransom rises fivefold to 10 bitcoins — or roughly USD $2,232 at current exchange rates. And those victims will no longer have the option to pay the ransom via MoneyPak.

Abrams said the service exposes two lies that the attackers have been perpetuating about their scheme. For starters, the bad guys have tried to dissuade victims from rolling back their system clocks to buy themselves more time to get the money together and pay the ransom. According to Abrams, this actually works in many cases to delay the countdown timer. Secondly, the launch of the Cryptolocker Decryption Service belies the claim that private keys needed to unlock files encrypted by CryptoLocker are deleted forever from the attacker’s servers after 72 hours.

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31
Aug 13

Syrian Electronic Army Denies New Data Leaks

The high-profile Web site defacement and hacker group known as the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA) continues to deny that its own Web server was hacked, even as gigabytes of data apparently seized during the compromise leaked onto the Deep Web this weekend.

Screen shot from SEA site syrian-es.org, listing the nicknames and avatars of top SEA leaders. Image: HP Security Research

Screen shot from SEA site syrian-es.org, listing the nicknames and avatars of top SEA leaders. Image: HP Security Research

Following a string of high profile attacks that compromised the Web sites of The New York Times and The Washington Post among others, many publications have sought to discover and spotlight the identities of core SEA members. On Wednesday, this blog published information from a confidential source who said that the SEA’s Web site was hacked and completely compromised in April 2013. That post referenced just a snippet of name and password data allegedly taken from the SEA’s site, including several credential pairs that appeared tied to a Syrian Web developer who worked with the SEA.

The SEA — through its Twitter accounts — variously denounced claims of the hack as a fraud or as a propaganda stunt by U.S. intelligence agencies aimed at discrediting the hacker group.

“We can guarantee our website has never been hacked, those who claim to have hacked it should publish their evidence. Don’t hold your breath,” members of the group told Mashable in an interview published on Friday. “In any case we do not have any sensitive or personal data on a public server. We are a distributed group, most of what we have and need is on our own machines and we collaborate on IRC.”

In apparent response to that challenge, a huge collection of data purportedly directly taken from the SEA’s server in April 2013 — including all of the the leaked credentials I saw earlier — was leaked today to Deep Web sites on Tor, an anonymity network. Visiting the leak site, known as a “hidden service,” is not possible directly via the regular Internet, but instead requires the use of the Tor Browser.

A leaked screen shot purportedly showing the email address of the owner of SEA site syrian-es.com

A leaked screen shot purportedly showing the email address of the owner of SEA site syrian-es.com

Among the leaked screen shots at the hidden Web site include numerous apparent snapshots of the SEA’s internal blog infrastructure, the Parallels virtual private server that powered for its syrian-es[dot]com Web site, as well as what are claimed to be dozens of credential pairs for various SEA member Twitter and LinkedIn accounts.

News of the archive leak to the Deep Web was first published by the French publication reflects.info (warning: some of the images published at that link may be graphic in nature). As detailed by the French site, the leak archive includes hundreds of working usernames and passwords to various Hotmail, Outlook and Gmail accounts, as well as more than six gigabytes of email messages downloaded from those accounts.

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2
Aug 11

New Tool Keeps Censors in the Dark

A new approach to overcoming state-level Internet censorship relies, ironically enough, on a technique that security experts have frequently associated with government surveillance.

Current anti-censorship technologies, including the services Tor and Dynaweb, direct connections to restricted websites through a network of encrypted proxy servers, with the aim of hiding who’s visiting such sites from censors. But the censors are constantly searching for and blocking these proxies. A new scheme, called Telex, makes it harder for censors to block communications by disguising traffic destined for restricted sites as traffic meant for popular, uncensored websites. It does this by employing the same method of analyzing packets of data that censors often use.

“To route around state-level Internet censorship, people have relied on proxy servers outside of the country doing the censorship,” says J. Alex Halderman, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. “The difficulty there is, you have to communicate to those people where the proxies are, and it’s very hard to do that without also letting the government censors figure out where the proxies are.”

The Telex system has two major components: “stations” at dozens of Internet service providers (ISPs)—the stations connect traffic from inside nations that censor to the rest of the Internet—and the Telex client software program that runs on the computers of people who want to avoid censorship.

This is an excerpt from a piece I wrote that was published today in MIT Technology Review. Read the full story here.