Posts Tagged: Windows 7

Jan 18

First ‘Jackpotting’ Attacks Hit U.S. ATMs

ATM “jackpotting” — a sophisticated crime in which thieves install malicious software and/or hardware at ATMs that forces the machines to spit out huge volumes of cash on demand — has long been a threat for banks in Europe and Asia, yet these attacks somehow have eluded U.S. ATM operators. But all that changed this week after the U.S. Secret Service quietly began warning financial institutions that jackpotting attacks have now been spotted targeting cash machines here in the United States.

To carry out a jackpotting attack, thieves first must gain physical access to the cash machine. From there they can use malware or specialized electronics — often a combination of both — to control the operations of the ATM.

A keyboard attached to the ATM port. Image: FireEye

On Jan. 21, 2018, KrebsOnSecurity began hearing rumblings about jackpotting attacks, also known as “logical attacks,” hitting U.S. ATM operators. I quickly reached out to ATM giantĀ NCR Corp. to see if they’d heard anything. NCR said at the time it had received unconfirmed reports, but nothing solid yet.

On Jan. 26, NCR sent an advisory to its customers saying it had received reports from the Secret Service and other sources about jackpotting attacks against ATMs in the United States.

“While at present these appear focused on non-NCR ATMs, logical attacks are an industry-wide issue,” the NCR alert reads. “This represents the first confirmed cases of losses due to logical attacks in the US. This should be treated as a call to action to take appropriate steps to protect their ATMs against these forms of attack and mitigate any consequences.”

The NCR memo does not mention the type of jackpotting malware used against U.S. ATMs. But a source close to the matter said the Secret Service is warning that organized criminal gangs have been attacking stand-alone ATMs in the United States using “Ploutus.D,” an advanced strain of jackpotting malware first spotted in 2013.

According to that source — who asked to remain anonymous because he was not authorized to speak on the record — the Secret Service has received credible information that crooks are activating so-called “cash out crews” to attack front-loading ATMs manufactured by ATM vendorĀ Diebold Nixdorf.

The source said the Secret Service is warning that thieves appear to be targeting Opteva 500 and 700 series Dielbold ATMs using the Ploutus.D malware in a series of coordinated attacks over the past 10 days, and that there is evidence that further attacks are being planned across the country.

“The targeted stand-alone ATMs are routinely located in pharmacies, big box retailers, and drive-thru ATMs,” reads a confidential Secret Service alert sent to multiple financial institutions and obtained by KrebsOnSecurity. “During previous attacks, fraudsters dressed as ATM technicians and attached a laptop computer with a mirror image of the ATMs operating system along with a mobile device to the targeted ATM.

Reached for comment, Diebold shared an alert it sent to customers Friday warning of potential jackpotting attacks in the United States. Diebold’s alert confirms the attacks so far appear to be targeting front-loaded Opteva cash machines.

“As in Mexico last year, the attack mode involves a series of different steps to overcome security mechanism and the authorization process for setting the communication with the [cash] dispenser,” the Diebold security alert reads. A copy of the entire Diebold alert, complete with advice on how to mitigate these attacks, is available here (PDF). Continue reading →

Nov 11

Adobe, Apple, Microsoft & Mozilla Issue Critical Patches

Adobe, Apple, Microsoft and Mozilla all released updates on Tuesday to fix critical security flaws in their products. Adobe issued a patch that corrects four vulnerabilities in Shockwave Player, while Redmond pushed updates to address four Windows flaws. Apple slipped out an update that mends at least 17 security holes in its version of Java, and Mozilla issued yet another major Firefox release, Firefox 8.

The only “critical” patch from Microsoft this month is a dangerous Windows flaw that could be triggered remotely to install malicious software just by sending the target system specially crafted packets of data. Microsoft says this vulnerability may be difficult to reliably exploit, but it should be patched immediately. Information on the other three flaws fixed this week is here. The fixes are available via Windows Updates for most supported versions of the operating system, including XP, Vista and Windows 7. Continue reading →

Dec 10

Exploit Published for New Internet Explorer Flaw

Hackers have released exploit code that can be used to compromise Windows PCs through a previously unknown security flaw present in all versions Internet Explorer, Microsoft warned today.

Dave Forstrom, director of trustworthy computing at Microsoft, said although the software giant is not aware of any attacks wielding this flaw against Windows users, “given the public disclosure of this vulnerability, the likelihood of criminals using this information to actively attack our customers may increase.”

Microsoft’s security advisory says the problem has to do with the way IE handles CSS style sheets. A posting on Microsoft’s Security Research & Defense blog notes that the Metasploit Project recently published an exploit for this flaw that evades two of the key security defenses built into Windows Vista and Windows 7 — Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR) and Data Execution Prevention (DEP).

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Oct 10

Demystifying KB976902, a.k.a. Microsoft’s “Blackhole” Update

I’ve received several e-mails from readers concerned about a mysterious, undocumented software patch that Microsoft began offering to Windows 7 users through Windows Update this week. Some Microsoft users have been spinning conspiracy theories about this patch because it lacks any real description of its function, and what little documentation there is about it says that it cannot be removed once installed and that it may be required as a prerequisite for installing future updates.

Normally, when Microsoft offers a patch through Windows Update, it also will publish a corresponding “knowledgebase” article that describes in great detail what the patch does and why users should install it — and how applying the update may impact current and future operations on the system.

This fix went out via Windows Update on Oct. 26 as a “recommended” and “important” patch, but it lacked any additional details, prompting conspiracy theories and speculation on message boards from users wondering whether they should ignore or install this update — which for many users was sandwiched between the dozens of security patches Microsoft began offering earlier this month as part of its regular Patch Tuesday security update cycle.

To make matters worse, many Windows 7 users said the patch was no longer offered after they declined installing it the first time, leading some curious researchers to dub it the “Blackhole” update.

I have verified with Microsoft that this update is designed to smooth the way for the deployment of future updates on Windows 7 systems (read on to the very end if you’d like the official response from Microsoft). The confusion appears to stem from a timing mistake by the folks at Microsoft, but this incident illustrates the hysteria that can ensue when the world’s largest software company fails — for whatever reason — to be fully transparent with a user base that has come to expect detailed advisories with every patch.

When I was researching this patch, I found an amusing thread on the Microsoft Answers forum — where several Microsoft most valuable professional experts urged other forum members to hold off installing the patch until more information was available. Others offered more speculative answers, suggesting that the patch was instead:

-A new service pack for Windows 7

-A “heuristic scanner to the machine that turned on whenever the machine went idle, and searched all attached storage devices for ‘terrorism-related’ information, then alerting ‘somebody’ over the Internet”

-The result of Microsoft having been hacked, with the patch being some kind of malicious third-party code being sent out to infect all Windows machines

-A new anti-piracy check from Microsoft.

Continue reading →