Posts Tagged: Heartland Payment Systems

Mar 14

The Long Tail of ColdFusion Fail

Earlier this month, I published a story about a criminal hacking gang using Adobe ColdFusion vulnerabilities to build a botnet of hacked e-commerce sites that were milked for customer credit card data. Today’s post examines the impact that this botnet has had on several businesses, as well as the important and costly lessons these companies learned from the intrusions.

cffailLast Tuesday’s story looked at two victims; the jam and jelly maker Smucker’s, and SecurePay, a credit card processor based in Georgia. Most of the companies contacted for this story did not respond to requests for comment. The few business listed that did respond had remarkably similar stories to tell about the ordeal of trying to keep their businesses up and running in the face of such intrusions. Each of them learned important lessons that any small online business would be wise to heed going forward.

The two companies that agreed to talk with me were both lighting firms, and both first learned of their site compromises after the credit card firm Discover alerted their card processors to a pattern of fraudulent activity on cards that were recently used at the stores., a Maple Grove, Minn. based company that sells lighting products, was among those listed in the ColdFusion botnet panel. Vice President Paul McLellan said he first learned of the breach on Nov. 7, 2013 from his company’s processor — Heartland Payment Systems.


McLellan said the unpatched ColdFusion vulnerabilities on the company’s site was certainly a glaring oversight. But he said he’s frustrated that his company was paying a third-party security compliance firm upwards of $6,000 a year to test for vulnerabilities and that the firm also missed the ColdFusion flaws.

“Shortly before we were told by Heartland, we paid $6,000 a year for a company to brutalize our server, for protection and peace of mind,” McLellan said. “Turns out this flaw had existed for two years and they never saw it. 

McLellan said the company received a visit from the FBI last year, and the agent said the group responsible for hitting Elightbulbs had compromised much more high-profile targets.

“The FBI investigator said, ‘Hey, don’t beat yourself up. We’ve got credit card processors and government institutions that run ColdFusion who were breached, this is small potatoes’,” McLellan said. “That was a small consolation.”

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Jul 13

Hacker Ring Stole 160 Million Credit Cards

U.S. federal authorities have indicted five men — four Russians and a Ukrainian – for allegedly perpetrating many of the biggest cybercrimes of the past decade, including the theft of more than 160 million credit card numbers from major U.S. retailers, banks and card processors.

The gang is thought to be responsible for the 2007 breach at credit card processor Heartland Payment Systems that exposed some 130 million card numbers, as well as the 2011 breach at Global Payments that involved nearly a million accounts and cost the company almost $100 million.

Federal prosecutors in New Jersey today called the case the largest hacking scheme ever prosecuted in the U.S. Justice Department officials said the men were part of a gang run by Albert “Soupnazi” Gonzalez, a hacker arrested in 2008 who is currently serving a 20-year-prison sentence for his role in many of the breaches, including the theft of some 90 million credit cards from retailer TJX.

One of the accused, 27-year-0ld Dmitriy Smilianets, is in U.S. custody. Vladimir Drinkman, 32 of Syktyvkar, Russia, is awaiting extradition to the United States. Three others named in the indictments remain at large, including Aleksandr Kalinin, 26 of St. Petersburg; 32-year-old Roman Kotov from Moscow; and Mikhail Rytikov, 26, of Odessa, Ukraine.

According to the government’s indictment, other high-profile heists tied to this gang include compromises at:

Hannaford Brothers Co: 2007, 4.2 million card numbers

Carrefour S.A.: 2007, 2 million card numbers

Commidea Ltd.: 2008, 30 million card numbers

Euronet: 2010, 2 million card numbers

Visa, Inc.: 2011, 800,000 card numbers

Discover Financial Services: 500,000 Diners card numbers

In addition, the group is being blamed for breaking into and planting malware on the networks of NASDAQ, 7-Eleven, JetBlue, JCPenny, Wet Seal, Dexia, Dow Jones, and Ingenicard.

The hackers broke into their targets using SQL injection attacks, which take advantage of weak server configurations to inject malicious code into the database behind the public-facing Web server. Once inside, the attackers can upload software and siphon data.

The government’s indictment alleges that the thieves were at times overwhelmed by the sheer amount of data yielded by their SQL attacks.  On Aug. 12, 2007, Kalinin allegedly sent Gonzalez  an instant message that he’d just gained access to 30 SQL servers on NASDAQ’s network, but hadn’t yet cracked the administrator passwords that secured the data inside. “These [databases] are hell big and I think most of info is trading histories.” On Jan. 9, 2008, after Gonzalez offered to help attack the trading floor’s computer systems, Kalinin allegedly messaged back, “NASDAQ is owned.”

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Apr 11

Are Megabreaches Out? E-Thefts Downsized in 2010

The number of financial and confidential records compromised as a result of data breaches in 2010 fell dramatically compared to previous years, a decrease that cybercrime investigators attribute to a sea-change in the motives and tactics used by criminals to steal information. At the same time, organizations of all sizes are dealing with more frequent  and smaller breaches than ever before, and most data thefts continue to result from security weaknesses that are relatively unsophisticated and easy to prevent.

These are some of the conclusions drawn from Verizon‘s fourth annual Data Breach Investigations Report. The report measures data breaches based on compromised records, including the theft of Social Security numbers, intellectual property, and credit card numbers, among other things.

It’s important to note at the outset that Verizon’s report only measures loss in terms of records breached. Many businesses hit by cyber crooks last year lost hundreds of thousands of dollars apiece when thieves stole one set of records, such as their online banking credentials.

The data-rich 74-page study is based on information gleaned from Verizon and U.S. Secret Service investigations into about 800 new data compromise incidents since last year’s report (the study also includes an appendix detailing 30 cybercrime cases investigated by the Dutch National High Tech Crime Unit).

Although the report examines the data from more breaches in a single year than ever before (the total Verizon/US Secret Service dataset from all previous years included just over 900 breaches), Verizon found that the total number of breached records fell from 361 million in 2008 to 144 million in 2009 to just 4 million last year.

A good portion of the report is dedicated to positing what might be responsible for this startling decline, but its authors seem unwilling to let the security industry take any credit for it.

“An optimist may interpret these results as a sign that the security industry is WINNING! Sorry, Charlie”, the report says. “While we’d really like that to be the case, one year just isn’t enough time for such a wholesale improvement in security practices necessary to cut data loss so drastically.”

The study suggests a number of possible explanations. For example:

-There were relatively few huge data heists. Those which had been responsible for the majority of the breached records in the past few years were breaches involving tens of millions of stolen credit and debit cards. Those high profile attacks may have achieved fame and fortune for the attackers, but they also attracted a lot of unwanted attention.  Many of the past megabreaches ended in the capture and arrest of those responsible, such the case of Albert Gonzales, the former Secret Service informant who was sentenced last year to 20 years in prison for his role in the theft of 130 million credit and debit card numbers from card processing giant Heartland Payment Systems. “Those that wish to stay out of jail may have changed their goals and tactics to stay  under the radar,” the report notes. “This could be one of the chief reasons behind the rash of ‘mini breaches’ involving smaller organizations.”

-Megabreaches of years past flooded criminal underground markets with so many stolen card numbers that their value plummeted. Criminals’ attention may have turned to stealing other lower profile data types, such as bank account credentials, personal information and intellectual property. In other words, criminals might opt to let the markets clear before stealing more huge quantities or selling what they already had purloined. “It’s worth noting that a lot of the cards that were stolen over the last few years in these megabreaches probably are going to start expiring soon,” said Bryan Sartin, director of investigative response at Verizon Business. “So we could be in a holding pattern right now.”

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