Posts Tagged: OG


9
Nov 18

Bug Bounty Hunter Ran ISP Doxing Service

A Connecticut man who’s earned bug bounty rewards and public recognition from top telecom companies for finding and reporting security holes in their Web sites secretly operated a service that leveraged these same flaws to sell their customers’ personal data, KrebsOnSecurity has learned.

In May 2018, ZDNet ran a story about the discovery of a glaring vulnerability in the Web site for wireless provider T-Mobile that let anyone look up customer home addresses and account PINs. The story noted that T-Mobile disabled the feature in early April after being alerted by a 22-year-old “security researcher” named Ryan Stevenson, and that the mobile giant had awarded Stevenson $1,000 for reporting the discovery under its bug bounty program.

The Twitter account @phobia, a.k.a. Ryan Stevenson. The term “plug” referenced next to his Twitch profile name is hacker slang for employees at mobile phone stores who can be tricked or bribed into helping with SIM swap attacks.

Likewise, AT&T has recognized Stevenson for reporting security holes in its services. AT&T’s bug bounty site lets contributors share a social media account or Web address where they can be contacted, and in Stevenson’s case he gave the now-defunct Twitter handle “@Phoobia.”

Stevenson’s Linkedin profile — named “Phobias” — says he specializes in finding exploits in numerous Web sites, including hotmail.com, yahoo.com, aol.com, paypal.com and ebay.com. Under the “contact info” tab of Stevenson’s profile it lists the youtube.com account of “Ryan” and the Facebook account “Phobia” (also now deleted).

Coincidentally, I came across multiple variations on this Phobia nickname as I was researching a story published this week on the epidemic of fraudulent SIM swaps, a complex form of mobile phone fraud that is being used to steal millions of dollars in cryptocurrencies.

Unauthorized SIM swaps also are often used to hijack so-called “OG” user accounts — usually short usernames on top social network and gaming Web sites that are highly prized by many hackers because they can make the account holder appear to have been a savvy, early adopter of the service before it became popular and before all of the short usernames were taken. Some OG usernames can be sold for thousands of dollars in underground markets.

This week’s SIM swapping story quoted one recent victim who lost $100,000 after his mobile phone number was briefly stolen in a fraudulent SIM swap. The victim said he was told by investigators in Santa Clara, Calif. that the perpetrators of his attack were able to access his T-Mobile account information using a specialized piece of software that gave them backdoor access to T-Mobile’s customer database.

Both the Santa Clara investigators and T-Mobile declined to confirm or deny the existence of this software. But their non-denials prompted me to start looking for it on my own. So naturally I began searching at ogusers-dot-com, a forum dedicated to the hacking, trading and sale of OG accounts. Unsurprisingly, ogusers-dot-com also has traditionally been the main stomping grounds for many individuals involved in SIM swapping attacks.

It didn’t take long to discover an account on ogusers named “Ryan,” who for much of 2018 has advertised a number of different “doxing” services — specifically those aimed at finding the personal information of customers at major broadband and telecom companies. Continue reading →


5
Nov 15

TalkTalk, Script Kids & The Quest for ‘OG’

So you’ve got two-step authentication set up to harden the security of your email account (you do, right?). But when was the last time you took a good look at the security of your inbox’s recovery email address? That may well be the weakest link in your email security chain, as evidenced by the following tale of a IT professional who saw two of his linked email accounts recently hijacked in a bid to steal his Twitter identity.

Screen Shot 2015-10-24 at 10.08.01 AMEarlier this week, I heard from Chris Blake, a longtime KrebsOnSecurity reader from the United Kingdom. Blake reached out because I’d recently written about a character of interest in the breach at British phone and broadband provider TalkTalk: an individual using the Twitter handle “@Fearful“.

Blake proceeded to explain how that same Fearful account had belonged to him for some time until May 2015, when an elaborate social engineering attack on his Internet service provider (ISP) allowed the current occupant of the account to swipe it out from under him.

On May 11, Blake received a text message on his mobile stating that his Microsoft Outlook account password had been changed. A minute later, he got another text from Microsoft saying his two-factor authentication (texted login codes to his phone) had been removed. After that, he could no longer log in to his Outlook account because someone had changed his password and removed his recovery email address (changing it to a free and disposable yopmail.com account).

Minutes after that, someone tweeted out the message from his account: “This twitter account is officially operated by Elliott G.” The tweet prior to that one mentions Blake by name and is a response to an inquiry to the Microsoft Store before the account was taken. The alias on Blake’s @Fearful account was changed to “Glubz”.

Blake said it took some time to figure out how the miscreant had hijacked his Twitter and Outlook accounts. Turns out, the recovery email address that he’d supplied for his Outlook account was to an email address at his local ISP, and the attacker executed the first step in the hijack by tricking a customer service employee at the ISP into redirecting his messages.

The attacker, apparently another person with a British accent, called Blake’s ISP pretending to be Blake and said he was locked out of his inbox. Could the ISP please change the domain name system (DNS) settings on his domain and associated mail account?

According to Blake, an investigation into the incident at the ISP shows that the customer service rep asked the caller to verify any other email addresses associated with Blake’s ISP account, and after some waiting the support employee actually read off a few of them. Seconds later, the attacker sent an email to the support person that spoofed one of those email addresses. After that, Blake’s ISP complied with the request, changing the DNS settings on his account to settings that the caller supplied for an account at Namecheaphosting.com.

OG IS A THING

With all of the access to other accounts that one’s inbox affords, the attacker in this case could have done some serious damage and cost Blake a lot of money. So why was he only interested in Blake’s Twitter account?

Short usernames are something of a prestige or status symbol for many youngsters, and some are willing to pay surprising amounts of money for them. Known as “OG” (short for “original” and also “original gangster”) in certain circles online, these can be usernames for virtually any service, from email accounts at Webmail providers to social media services like Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter and Youtube. People who traffic in OG accounts prize them because they can make the account holder appear to have been a savvy, early adopter of the service before it became popular and before all of the short usernames were taken.

“I didn’t realize this was even a thing until all this happened,” Blake said of the demand for OG accounts. “It wasn’t until the day after my email accounts were hacked that I realized it was really my Twitter account he was after.”

As it happens, the guy who is currently squatting on Blake’s @Fearful Twitter account — a young wanna-be hacker who uses the nickname “Glubz” — is very publicly in the business of selling hijacked OG accounts. In the screen shot below, we can see Glubz on the script kiddie-friendly online community Hackforums promoting his “OG Store,” in which he sells “Snapchats,” Email accounts and “Youtubes” for $10-$40 apiece, payable via Bitcoin or PayPal. The bottom of the message includes a link to Glubz’s personal site — elliottg[dot]net (also hosted at Namecheaphosting.com). Continue reading →