Posts Tagged: Adobe Flash Player update


12
Nov 13

Zero-Days Rule November’s Patch Tuesday

Microsoft today issued security updates to fix at least 19 vulnerabilities in its software, including a zero-day flaw in Internet Explorer browser that is already being actively exploited. Separately, Adobe has released a critical update that plugs at least two security holes in its Flash Player software.

crackedwinThree of the eight patches that Microsoft released earned its most dire “critical” label, meaning the vulnerabilities fixed in them can be exploited by malware or miscreants remotely without any help from Windows users. Among the critical patches is an update for Internet Explorer (MS13-088) that mends at least two holes in the default Windows browser (including IE 11). MS13-089 is a critical file handling flaw present in virtually every supported version of Windows.

The final critical patch – MS13-090 — fixes essentially another IE flaw (ActiveX) that showed up in targeted attacks late last week. Microsoft says attackers used a second, “information disclosure” vulnerability in tandem with the ActiveX flaw, but that the company is still investigating that one. It noted that its Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) tool successfully blocked the ActiveX exploit.

Nevertheless, it’s important for IE users to apply these updates as quickly as possible. According to Rapid7, exploit code for the ActiveX vulnerability appeared on Pastebin this morning.

“It was known to be under some targeted exploitation, but that will probably expand now that the exploit is public,” said Ross Barrett, senior manager of security engineering at Rapid7. “I would call patching this issue priority #1.” For what it’s worth, Microsoft agrees, at least according to this suggested patch deployment chart.

Today’s patch batch from Redmond did not include an official patch for yet another zero-day vulnerability that has been under active exploitation, although Microsoft did release a stopgap Fix-It tool last week to help blunt the threat. The company also is once again advising Windows users to take another look at EMET.

Check out Microsoft’s Technet blog for more information on these and other updates that the company released today.

brokenflash-aIn a separate patch release, Adobe issued a fix for its Flash Player software for Windows, Mac, Linux and Android devices. The Flash update brings the ubiquitous player to v. 11.9.900.152 on Mac and Windows systems. Users browsing the Web with IE10 or IE11 on Windows 8.x should get the new version of Flash (11.9.900.152) automatically; IE users not on Windows 8 will need to update manually if Flash is not set to auto-update.

To check which version of Flash you have installed, visit this page. Direct links to the various Flash installers are available here. Be aware that downloading Flash Player from Adobe’s recommended spot – this page – often includes add-ons, security scanners or other crud you probably don’t want. Strangely enough, when I visited that page today with IE10 , the download included a pre-checked box to install Google Toolbar and to switch my default browser to Google Chrome.

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12
Feb 13

Fat Patch Tuesday

Adobe and Microsoft each have issued security updates to fix multiple critical vulnerabilities in their products. Adobe released updates for Flash Player, AIR and Shockwave; Microsoft pushed out a dozen patches addressing at least 57 security holes in Windows, Office, Internet Explorer, Exchange and .NET Framework.

winiconFive of the 12 patches Microsoft released today earned its most dire “critical” label, meaning these updates fix vulnerabilities that attackers or malware could exploit to seize complete control over a PC with no help from users.

Thirteen of the 57 bugs squashed in Microsoft’s patch batch address issues with Internet Explorer; other critical patches fix problems in the Windows implementation of Vector Markup Language (VML), Microsoft Exchange, and flaws in the way Windows handles certain media files. The remaining critical patch fixes a flaw that is present only on Windows XP systems.

Updates are available via Windows Update or from Automatic Update. A note about applying these Windows patches: Today’s batch includes an update for .NET, which in my experience should be applied separately. In nearly every case where I’ve experienced problems updating Windows, a huge .NET patch somehow gummed up the works. Consider applying the rest of the patches first, rebooting, and then installing the .NET update, if your system requires it.

And for the second time in a week, Adobe has released an update for its Flash Player software. This one addresses at least 17  distinct vulnerabilities; unlike last week’s emergency Flash Update, this one thankfully doesn’t address flaws that are already actively being exploited, according to Adobe. Check the graphic below for the most recent version that includes the updates relevant to your operating system. This link should tell you which version of Flash your browser has installed. The most recent versions are available from the Adobe download center, but beware potentially unwanted add-ons, like McAfee Security Scan). To avoid this, uncheck the pre-checked box before downloading, or grab your OS-specific Flash download from here.

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8
Jan 13

Adobe, Microsoft Ship Critical Security Updates

Adobe and Microsoft today separately issued updates to fix critical security vulnerabilities in their products. Adobe pushed out fixes for security issues in Acrobat, Adobe Reader and its Flash Player plugin. Microsoft released seven patches addressing at least a dozen security holes in Windows and other software, although it failed to issue an official patch for a dangerous flaw in its Internet Explorer Web browser that attackers are now actively exploiting.

Two of the patches that Microsoft issued today earned a “critical” rating, signifying that these vulnerabilities could be exploited to fully compromise vulnerable Windows systems without any help from users. Microsoft called special attention to two critical bugs in its XML Core Services component; the company said it is likely that malware or miscreants will figure out a way to exploit these flaws in active attacks sometime within the next 30 days.

Unfortunately, Microsoft did not offer an official fix for a critical Windows flaw that malware and miscreants are already exploiting. In late December, Microsoft acknowledged that attackers were using a previously undocumented security hole in Internet Explorer versions 6 through 8 to break into Windows PCs. Microsoft later issued a stopgap “FixIt” tool to help lessen the vulnerability on affected systems, but researchers last week demonstrated that the FixIt tool only blocked some methods of attacking the flaw, leaving other ways unguarded. Meanwhile, a working copy of the exploit has been folded into Metasploit, a free penetration testing tool.

Wolfgang Kandek, chief technology officer at vulnerability management firm Qualys, said the zero-day IE vulnerability affects 90% of the IE install base at this time.

“Microsoft is not providing a patch today, though they have provided a Fix-It for the issue,” Kandek wrote in a blog post. “The vulnerability should be tracked closely, as a large percentage of enterprises still run the affected versions.”

Users who wish to continue browsing the Web with IE should upgrade to IE9 if possible (IE10 on Windows 8 also is not vulnerable). Users still on Windows XP will not be able to update to IE9, but may be able to derive some protection from the FixIt tool and by using Microsoft’s EMET tool. XP users may be better off, however, browsing with Firefox or Chrome with some type of script blocking and/or sandbox in place. More information on how to use EMET and script blocking options is available in my Tools for a Safer PC primer. More details about today’s updates from Microsoft can be found at the Microsoft Security Response Center blog and in the security bulletin summaries for each patch.

The Adobe Flash patch fixes at least one critical vulnerability in the media player plugin. Updates are available for all supported versions of Flash, including for Windows, Mac, Linux and Android. See the chart below for the latest version number broken down by operating system.

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6
Nov 12

Adobe Ships Election Day Security Update for Flash

Adobe has released a critical security update for its Flash Player and Adobe AIR software that fixes at least seven dangerous vulnerabilities in these products. Updates are available for Windows, Mac, Linux and Android systems.

Today’s update, part of Adobe’s regularly scheduled patch cycle for Flash, brings Flash Player to version 11.5.502.110 on Windows and Mac systems (other OS users see graphic below). Adobe urges users to grab the latest updates from its Flash Player Download Center, but that option pushes junk add-ons like McAfee VirusScan. Instead, download the appropriate version for your system from Adobe’s Flash Player Distribution page. Most users can find out what version of Flash they have installed by visiting this link.

The Flash Player installed with Google Chrome should soon be automatically updated to the latest Google Chrome version, which will include Flash Player 11.5.31.2 for Windows, Macintosh and Linux. Note that Windows users who browse the Web with Internet Explorer and another browser will need to apply the Flash update twice, once using IE and again with the other browser. Internet Explorer 10 users on Windows 8 can grab the update via Windows Update or from Microsoft’s site, or wait for the browser to auto-update the plugin.

Adobe’s advisory about this update is available here, including links to update AIR if you have that installed. An Adobe spokesperson said the company is not aware of any active attacks or exploits in the wild for any of the issues patched in this release. Nevertheless, it’s a bad idea to delay Flash updates; the software’s ubiquity makes it a primary target of malware and miscreants alike.