Posts Tagged: FedEx


25
Sep 17

Source: Deloitte Breach Affected All Company Email, Admin Accounts

Deloitte, one of the world’s “big four” accounting firms, has acknowledged a breach of its internal email systems, British news outlet The Guardian revealed today. Deloitte has sought to downplay the incident, saying it impacted “very few” clients. But according to a source close to the investigation, the breach dates back to at least the fall of 2016, and involves the compromise of all administrator accounts at the company as well as Deloitte’s entire internal email system.

deloitte

In a story published Monday morning, The Guardian said a breach at Deloitte involved usernames, passwords and personal data on the accountancy’s top blue-chip clients.

“The Guardian understands Deloitte clients across all of these sectors had material in the company email system that was breached,” The Guardian’s Nick Hopkins wrote. “The companies include household names as well as US government departments. So far, six of Deloitte’s clients have been told their information was ‘impacted’ by the hack.”

In a statement sent to KrebsOnSecurity, Deloitte acknowledged a “cyber incident” involving unauthorized access to its email platform.

“The review of that platform is complete,” the statement reads. “Importantly, the review enabled us to understand precisely what information was at risk and what the hacker actually did and to determine that only very few clients were impacted [and] no disruption has occurred to client businesses, to Deloitte’s ability to continue to serve clients, or to consumers.”

However, information shared by a person with direct knowledge of the incident said the company in fact does not yet know precisely when the intrusion occurred, or for how long the hackers were inside of its systems.

This source, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the team investigating the breach focused their attention on a company office in Nashville known as the “Hermitage,” where the breach is thought to have begun.

The source confirmed The Guardian reporting that current estimates put the intrusion sometime in the fall of 2016, and added that investigators still are not certain that they have completely evicted the intruders from the network.

Indeed, it appears that Deloitte has known something was not right for some time. According to this source, the company sent out a “mandatory password reset” email on Oct. 13, 2016 to all Deloitte employees in the United States. The notice stated that employee passwords and personal identification numbers (PINs) needed to be changed by Oct. 17, 2016, and that employees who failed to do so would be unable to access email or other Deloitte applications. The message also included advice on how to pick complex passwords:

A screen shot of the mandatory password reset email Deloitte sent to all U.S. employees in Oct. 2016, around the time sources say the breach was first discovered.

A screen shot of the mandatory password reset message Deloitte sent to all U.S. employees in Oct. 2016, around the time sources say the breach was first discovered.

The source told KrebsOnSecurity they were coming forward with information about the breach because, “I think it’s unfortunate how we have handled this and swept it under the rug. It wasn’t a small amount of emails like reported. They accessed the entire email database and all admin accounts. But we never notified our advisory clients or our cyber intel clients.” Continue reading →


4
Aug 14

‘White Label’ Money Laundering Services

Laundering the spoils from cybercrime can be a dicey affair, fraught with unreliable middlemen and dodgy, high-priced services that take a huge cut of the action. But large-scale cybercrime operations can avoid these snares and become much more profitable when they’re able to disguise their operations as legitimate businesses operating in the United States, and increasingly they are doing just that.

The typical process of "cashing out" stolen credit card accounts.

The typical process of “cashing out” stolen credit card accounts.

Today’s post looks at one such evolution in a type of service marketed to cybercrooks that has traditionally been perhaps the most common way that thieves overseas “cash out” cybercrimes committed against American and European businesses, banks and consumers: The reshipping of goods purchased through stolen credit cards.

Cybercrooks very often rely on international reshipping services to help move electronics and other goods that are bought with stolen credit cards, shipped abroad, and then sold for cash. Many fraudsters use stolen credit cards to pay for U.S. Postal Service and FedEx shipping labels — a.k.a. “black labels” — but major shipping providers appear to be getting better at blocking or intercepting packages sent with stolen credit cards (at least according to anecdotal evidence from the cybercrime forums).

As a result, crooks increasingly are turning to a more reliable freight: So-called “white label” shipping services that are paid for with cybercrime-funded bank accounts via phony but seemingly legitimate companies in the United States. Continue reading →


31
Jul 12

Email-Based Malware Attacks, July 2012

Last month’s post examining the top email-based malware attacks received so much attention and provocative feedback that I thought it was worth revisiting. I assembled it because victims of cyberheists rarely discover or disclose how they got infected with the Trojan that helped thieves siphon their money, and I wanted to test conventional wisdom about the source of these attacks.

Top malware attacks and their antivirus detection rates, past 30 days. Source: UAB

While the data from the past month again shows why that wisdom remains conventional, I believe the subject is worth periodically revisiting because it serves as a reminder that these attacks can be stealthier than they appear at first glance.

The threat data draws from daily reports compiled by the computer forensics and security management students at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The UAB reports track the top email-based threats from each day, and include information about the spoofed brand or lure, the method of delivering the malware, and links to Virustotal.com, which show the number of antivirus products that detected the malware as hostile (virustotal.com scans any submitted file or link using about 40 different antivirus and security tools, and then provides a report showing each tool’s opinion).

As the chart I compiled above indicates, attackers are switching the lure or spoofed brand quite often, but popular choices include such household names as American Airlines, Ameritrade, Craigslist, Facebook, FedEx, Hewlett-Packard (HP), Kraft, UPS and Xerox. In most of the emails, the senders spoofed the brand name in the “from:” field, and used embedded images stolen from the brands being spoofed.

The one detail most readers will probably focus on most this report is the atrociously low detection rate for these spammed malware samples. On average, antivirus software detected these threats about 22 percent of the time on the first day they were sent and scanned at virustotal.com. If we take the median score, the detection rate falls to just 17 percent. That’s actually down from last month’s average and median detection rates, 24.47 percent and 19 percent, respectively.

Continue reading →


31
Oct 11

Turning Hot Credit Cards into Hot Stuff

Would that all cybercriminal operations presented such a tidy spreadsheet of the victim and perpetrator data as comprehensively as profsoyuz.biz, one of the longest-running criminal reshipping programs on the Internet.

Launched in 2006 under a slightly different domain name, profsoyuz.biz is marketed on invite-only forums to help credit card thieves “cash out” compromised credit and debit card accounts by purchasing and selling merchandise online. Most Western businesses will not ship to Russia and Eastern Europe due to high fraud rates in those areas. Underground businesses like Profsoyuz hire Americans to receive stolen merchandise and reship it to those embargoed regions. Then they charge vetted customers for access to those reshipping services.

Below is a screen shot of the administrative interface for Profsoyuz, which shows why its niche business is often called “Drops for Stuff” on the underground. The “Дроп” or “Drop” column lists Americans who are currently reshipping packages for the crime gang; the “Стафф” or “Stuff” column shows the items that are being purchased and reshipped with stolen credit card numbers.

Profsoyuz reshipping service admin panel.

The column marked “Холдер” or “Holder” indicates the cardholder — the name on the stolen credit card account that was used to purchase the stuff being sent to the drops. I rang Laura Kowaleski, listed as the person whose credit card was fraudulently used on Oct. 11, 2011 to buy a Star Wars Lego set for $189, plus $56 in shipping. She told me I reached her while she was in the process of filing a police report online, after reporting the unauthorized charge to her credit card company.

The Lego set was sent via FedEx to Oscar Padilla, a 37-year-old from Los Angeles. Padilla said he believed he was working for Transit Air Cargo Inc. (transitair.com), a legitimate shipping company in Santa Ana, Calif., and that he got hired in his current position after responding to a job offer on careerbuilder.com. However, the Web site used by the company that recruited him was transitac.com.

Continue reading →