Posts Tagged: SANS Institute

Mar 13

KrebsOnSecurity Wins Awards

I recently returned from San Francisco, which last week hosted the annual RSA Security conference. I had the pleasure of moderating a panel discussion on Raising the Costs of Compromise with some very smart guys, and also shared a stage with several security authors who were recognized for their contributions to infosec media.

Bruce Schneier, Jack Daniel & Krebs. Image: Alan Shimel.

Bruce Schneier, Jack Daniel & Krebs. Image: Alan Shimel. was honored with the “Blog That Best Represents the Industry,” award at the RSA Security Blogger Meetup. This was the third year in a row that judges bestowed that honor on this blog. also won the award for “Most Educational Security Blog.”

Paul Dotcom won for “Best Security Podcast”; J4VV4D’s Blog earned the “Most Entertaining Security Blog” award; Sophos’s Naked Security Blog took home the “Best Corporate Security Blog” prize; and the “Single Best Blog Post or Podcast of the Year” went to Forbes’ Andy Greenberg, for Meet the Hackers Who Sell Spies the Tools to Crack Your PC (And Get Paid Six-Figure Fees). Finally, security blogger Jack Daniel was the latest greybeard inducted into the Security Bloggers Hall of Fame (Bruce Schneier and I shared that honor last year, which is why we’re both pictured on stage flanking Jack in this shot from last week).

Yours truly also was named one of 10 winners of the SANS Institute‘s “Top Cyber Security Journalist” award. I am truly honored for the recognition, and want to thank all the loyal readers of this blog for their constant encouragement and support.

Nov 10

Keeping an Eye on the SpyEye Trojan

Last month, I published evidence suggesting that future development of the ZeuS banking Trojan was being merged with that of the up-and-coming SpyEye Trojan. Since then, a flood of new research has been published about SpyEye, including a new Web site that helps track the location of SpyEye control networks worldwide.

Roman Hüssy, the curator of Zeustracker — a site that has spotlighted ZeuS activity around the globe since early 2009 — late last week launched SpyEye Tracker, a sister service designed to help Internet service providers keep tabs on miscreants using SpyEye (take care with the IP address links listed at this service, because they can lead to live, malicious files).

Hüssy said he’s not convinced that the SpyEye crimeware kit will usurp the mighty ZeuS. “Why should they give up something which works and pay for a new tool?” he said in an online chat with Instead, Hüssy said he’s launching the new tracking service to help prevent that shift.

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Mar 10

Cybersecurity Policy Roundup

There are several cybersecurity policy issues on Capitol Hill that are worth keeping an eye on. Lawmakers in the Senate have introduced a measure that would call for trade restrictions against countries identified as hacker havens. Another proposal is meeting resistance from academics who worry about the effect of the bill’s mandatory certification programs for cyber security professionals.

As reported by The Hill newspaper, Senators Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) have introduced The International Cybercrime Reporting and Cooperation Act, a bill that would penalize foreign countries that fail to crack down on cyber criminals operating within their borders.

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Mar 10

Krebsonsecurity Author Twice Honored

There is perhaps no greater compliment than to have your most esteemed peers recommend your work.  I am now blogging from the RSA Conference in San Francisco, and over the past two days has received two peer recognition awards, one from the SANS Institute – among the nation’s top security research and training groups – and another from the Security Bloggers Network, an organization that has sought to recognize blogs that provide valuable content on computer security issues.

The SANS Institute polled 75 cybersecurity journalists and asked them to rank the top peers in their field. True to form, I showed up late to the awards ceremony on Tuesday, and Alan Paller, director of research for SANS, called me up on stage and said I’d received twice as many votes as the next guy in the contest, Robert McMillan, a reporter whose work is almost certainly the most widely syndicated and quoted of virtually anyone in this industry. Likewise, I am proud to have shared this honor with reporters whose work I recommend and admire, including USA Today’s Byron Acohido,’s Kim Zetter, as well as Dan Goodin from The Register.

In related news, the delegates who were party to the Security Bloggers Awards at RSA this year picked as the top “non-technical security blog.” Somehow, I managed to show up late for this as well. Again, it was wonderful to have been nominated alongside security bloggers such as Taosecurity’s Richard Bejtlich, and security curmudgeon-in-chief Bruce Schneier.