Posts Tagged: USPS


3
Jul 12

Who Says Email Is Eating at Postal Revenues?

Shadowy online businesses that sell knockoff prescription drugs through spam and other dodgy advertising practices have begun relying more heavily on the U.S. Postal Service to deliver prescription drugs to buyers in the United States direct from warehouses or mules within the U.S. The shift comes as rogue online pill shops are seeking ways to lower shipping costs, a major loss leader for most of these operations.

An ad for Rx-Parners pill shop that ships from the US.

Traditionally, a majority of the counterfeit pills advertised and sold to Americans online have shipped from India. But the process of getting the pills from India to customers in the United States is so expensive and fraught with complications that it has proved to be a big cost center for the largest rogue pharmaceutical operations, according to a study I wrote about last month.

“One of the surprising things we found was that shipping dominates program costs,” said Stefan Savage, one of the lead authors on the study, and a professor in the systems and networking group at the University of California San Diego.

The researchers discovered that most rogue pharmacy operations spend between 11 to 12 percent of their annual revenue on shipping costs. Part of the reason for the high cost is that pill shipments from India and elsewhere outside of the United States frequently get delayed or confiscated by U.S. Customs officials. This forces the rogue pharmacies to either refund the customer’s money, or to eat the costs of re-shipping the pills.

Increasingly, however, some of the largest spam affiliate programs are delivering some of their most popular drugs — including erectile dysfunction pills and everything from Accutane to Cipro and Diflucan and Plavix — direct to U.S. buyers from shipping locations within the United States.

“This is why you see pharmacy outfits like RX-Partners, Mailien and Stimulcash picking the most popular drugs and warehousing them in the United States so they can do USPS shipping through mules,” Savage said.

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31
Oct 11

Turning Hot Credit Cards into Hot Stuff

Would that all cybercriminal operations presented such a tidy spreadsheet of the victim and perpetrator data as comprehensively as profsoyuz.biz, one of the longest-running criminal reshipping programs on the Internet.

Launched in 2006 under a slightly different domain name, profsoyuz.biz is marketed on invite-only forums to help credit card thieves “cash out” compromised credit and debit card accounts by purchasing and selling merchandise online. Most Western businesses will not ship to Russia and Eastern Europe due to high fraud rates in those areas. Underground businesses like Profsoyuz hire Americans to receive stolen merchandise and reship it to those embargoed regions. Then they charge vetted customers for access to those reshipping services.

Below is a screen shot of the administrative interface for Profsoyuz, which shows why its niche business is often called “Drops for Stuff” on the underground. The “Дроп” or “Drop” column lists Americans who are currently reshipping packages for the crime gang; the “Стафф” or “Stuff” column shows the items that are being purchased and reshipped with stolen credit card numbers.

Profsoyuz reshipping service admin panel.

The column marked “Холдер” or “Holder” indicates the cardholder — the name on the stolen credit card account that was used to purchase the stuff being sent to the drops. I rang Laura Kowaleski, listed as the person whose credit card was fraudulently used on Oct. 11, 2011 to buy a Star Wars Lego set for $189, plus $56 in shipping. She told me I reached her while she was in the process of filing a police report online, after reporting the unauthorized charge to her credit card company.

The Lego set was sent via FedEx to Oscar Padilla, a 37-year-old from Los Angeles. Padilla said he believed he was working for Transit Air Cargo Inc. (transitair.com), a legitimate shipping company in Santa Ana, Calif., and that he got hired in his current position after responding to a job offer on careerbuilder.com. However, the Web site used by the company that recruited him was transitac.com.

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